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DIGITAL TOKEN IDENTIFIER REGISTRATION OPENS WITH ETRADING SOFTWARE

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Top 100 cryptocurrencies can now be tracked authoritatively using new ISO standard

 

Etrading Software, through its non-profit division the DTI Foundation, has just launched a new service to enable the tracking of all digital assets on a global basis. The service will issue identifiers for digital assets based on the new ISO standard, the Digital Token Identifier. ISO has selected Etrading Software to be the Registration Authority for this standard.

The new service is complementary to the existing ISO standard for tracking counterparties to a trade via the Legal Entity Identifier (LEI). It is designed by the same committee that has defined the ISO standard for the Unique Product Identifier (UPI) for tracking all OTC derivatives globally. Both the LEI and the UPI have been recommended by the Financial Stability Board to be used for regulatory reporting of trades across the G20 to enhance risk management and increase transparency in traditional capital markets.

The DTI extends the scope of the ISO standards to the digital token asset class. With the DTI Foundation’s launch of the DTI service, a key building block is now in place to upgrade the financial market plumbing to process digital asset trades safely and with appropriate oversight. Until now, such monitoring and tracking was impossible due to the lack of available ISO standards for digital assets.

The DTI can be used by regulators to monitor digital asset trades for anti-money laundering / combating terrorist financing requirements and also for monitoring systemic risks arising from the trading of global stable-coins and other digital assets. The DTI can be used by market participants to uniquely identify a given digital token (for example to distinguish unambiguously between ‘Bitcoin’ and ‘Bitcoin Cash’) thereby increasing transparency for market participants and reducing operational risk.

The DTI Foundation has proactively issued identifiers for the top 100 cryptocurrencies by market capitalisation, thereby enabling all major cryptocurrencies to be tracked, including bitcoin, ether, Tether and Ripple. With the opening of registration to market participants, the DTI Foundation also commits to issuing additional identifiers as required by market participants and regulators, with global stablecoins being a priority area given their potential systemic impact.

Dominique Tanner, Chairman of ISO/TC 68/SC 8, said, “ISO 24165, can be used by investors, exchanges, data aggregators, ecosystem participants, regulators and issuers, who can now submit an application to register a fungible digital token and receive a DTI, which is a random, unique and unambiguous identifier. Registration eligibility for the DTI is based on objective and verifiable information provided by the applicant. This will help the market identify different tokens that may be exchanged, aggregated, listed, or tracked.”

Sassan Danesh, Managing Partner of Etrading Software, said, “We are delighted that the new DTI has begun work, helping industry uniquely identify digital assets based on objective, verifiable information. This is an important step for the industry in being able to identify digital assets, in a standardised way and reduce ambiguity, increasing transparency and consistency, enabling further global interoperability and lower the bar for greater institutional investment in this burgeoning asset class.”

 

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How to reignite your store with streamlined operations and a distinctive customer experience

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Colin Neil, MD, Adyen UK

 

Retailers know that prioritising customer experience is vital to success today. This, amongst the management of complex supply chains and the cost of living crisis is a lot to oversee.

Further, the pandemic has accelerated technology’s role in building a relationship between store and customer. Consumer adoption of digital, cashless payments has accelerated. PwC’s ‘Payments 2025 and Beyond’ report predicted that cashless transactions could triple in volume by 2030. This trend aligns with our own experience of 2021, in which we’ve witnessed a 70% jump in transaction volumes. It demonstrates the rapid digital transformation of retail as pandemic trends amplified the role of ecommerce in online and offline sales.

Operationally, there’s a lot for retailers to think about. The question is: Which are the technologies that will allow them to truly transform the customer experience?

Consider Android mPOS

Traditional mobile POS (mPOS) terminals are a great way to unshackle sales from a static cash-desk, helping to reduce queues and improve the overall shopping experience. However, they’ve also presented some operational challenges. These devices only take payments; they’re unable to scan barcodes or check stock, meaning that sales teams become burdened with a utility-belt’s worth of additional devices to fulfil these needs.

But recently, the entrance of the new Android mPOS terminal has caused a stir since it’s an all-in-one solution that can manage a multitude of functions, via installed apps. This includes: checking a customer’s previous orders and eliminating the need for separate cash registers, barcode scanners, and even customer facing displays.

These devices represent a fundamental change in the role of the payment terminal. Thanks to its app management system, retailers can manage the functions they use every day in a single hand-held device, from inventory management, to loyalty programmes, returns and more.

Palisis, a provider of sales and operations solutions for tourism and transportation businesses, and Immfly, an in-flight digital services provider, are among the first of our customers to roll out the terminals. In doing so, they’re simplifying the management of their business and freeing up staff to focus on the customer experience. Here’s how:

  1. Streamlining operations

Android mPOS terminals let you consolidate your store’s business functions into one device. This is a big benefit for your bottom line, since managing multiple systems and hardware can lead to high costs, from set up to ongoing maintenance. Furthermore, customisation from a centralised location gives an overview of all a retailer’s terminals. Adyen’s Terminal Fleet Manager, for example, is capable of multiple configurations – including terminal location, logo, refunds, receipts etc – remotely.

Consolidating these systems reduces cost of ownership, helping you free up budget for other investments and innovations. It’s also simpler for staff to use the one system, making their jobs much easier, especially during busy periods.

  1. Flexibility to grow

When systems are consolidated on a single device, it’s easier to update and scale technology as your business evolves. For example, if you process payments on a centralised platform, like Adyen, the same software and end-to-end encryption can be quickly rolled out across all your stores, anywhere in the world. You can also cater to customers’ preferred local payment methods, as well as the major global ones, without needing additional terminals or worrying about local acquiring headaches.

On top of that, if all customer-facing channels and backend systems are connected via one platform, you can monitor online and in-person payments in one place. You can recognise and reward loyal customers in real-time, future-proofing the customer experience with invaluable data insights. 

  1. Convenience for customers

Mobile devices allow customers to make purchases from anywhere. This has led some retailers to consider doing away with the till area completely. Tesco’s entered this space last year, and Sainsbury’s partnered with Amazon to introduce the experience too. With no cash desks, the store is given over completely to product and service.

Getting your roll out right

Take a look at what our customers Immfly and Palisis have been able to achieve with their roll out. Immfly needed to be able to create and process drinks and snack orders during flights, without involving any extra hardware for air stewards to handle and manage. Its Android S1F2 devices integrate cash register systems directly onto WiFi-enabled terminals via an app, which sync stock levels throughout the flight. Payments can also be taken while offline on both long and short haul flights. These capabilities also mean leading ticketing and reservation tech provider Palisis can use them in many different weather conditions, from ski slopes to tour buses in the world’s biggest cities.

The best customer experiences are convenient and modern payment terminals can help retailers deliver this. Just remember, when you’re looking to roll out any new in-store tech, it’s important to research and pilot the scheme thoroughly. In that way, you’ll be sure to have the best possible impact on your customer experience and ultimately your revenue.

 

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PCI DSS Compliance in the Cloud – Everything you should know

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Introduction

PCI DSS 4.0 is the latest and updated version of PCI DSS that was introduced on March 31st, 2022. This updated standard is set to go effective 2 years from now in 2025. PCI DSS is an international payment security standard established to ensure the secure processing of payment cards online. While the security standard is not a mandate, yet it is seen as an industry best practice that should be adopted by every organization and services provider dealing with payment card data. Any organization storing, processing, and transmitting card data must comply with PCI DSS Compliance. By this, we mean any Service Providers including those offering Cloud Service are required to comply with the payment standard. In fact, the PCI Council clearly states that Cloud security is a shared responsibility between the Cloud Service Provider and its clients.

So, while Merchants need to ensure PCI DSS Compliance, Cloud Service providers also need to ensure the security of card data and accordingly meet the PCI compliance requirements. But when we talk about compliance we need to now keep in mind that the requirements have to be met as per the evolved PCI DSS 4.0 version. Although the fundamentals of PCI DSS still remain the same yet the PCI Council has evolved the standard with additional requirements and stringent security requirements.  Elaborating on this, we have today explained how PCI Compliance impacts Cloud Service Providers, the technical and operational requirements they need to meet, and key considerations for them to ensure compliance.

PCI DSS Compliance for Cloud Service Providers

In the payment card industry security and privacy of card data is a major concern, especially when the services are outsourced. There is a very common misconception that prevails concerning PCI DSS Compliance. While some believe PCI DSS Compliance is for Merchants to comply with, some say it is the Cloud Service Providers who need to comply with the payment security standard. But in reality, data security and PCI DSS Compliance is a shared responsibility between both Merchants & Cloud Service Providers.

For these reasons, it is important that all the security-related roles and responsibilities are well-defined between both parties. This should further be documented to ensure accountability. However, it is also important to understand that the responsibility defined should be based on the type of Cloud Service Model which could be Infrastructure as a Service Provider (IaaS), Software as a Service Provider (SaaS), and Platform as a Service Provider (PaaS). Depending on the level of control over the Cloud Infrastructure, the responsibilities concerning PCI DSS Compliance can be defined between Merchants and Service Providers. Besides, PCI Compliance clearly mandates sharing of responsibilities among both Merchants and Service Providers where ever applicable.

If the payment card data is stored, processed, or transmitted in the cloud environment, PCI DSS automatically applies to that environment and will require validation of the Merchants and Cloud Service Provider’s access to the environment. The allocation of responsibility between the Merchant and Cloud Service Provider does not exempt either from their responsibility to secure data as per PCI DSS requirements. For this, clear policies, procedures, and processes must be defined and agreed upon between the Merchant and Cloud Service Providers. This should include defining all the security control requirements, roles, and responsibilities for operation, management, and reporting as per the PCI Requirement.

How Responsibilities can be shared based on the Cloud Model? 

PCI DSS 3.2.1v which is now the older version of PCI DSS, had the responsibilities clearly defined among the merchants and the third-parties involved as outlined in the below table. While this can still be applicable in a given scenario, yet it is also important to note that this may now not be the only approach towards implementing the shared responsibilities. Since the PCI Council has now introduced customized approach along with the option of the traditional defined approach, in the PCI DSS 4.0, the responsibilities between the Merchants and Service Providers may vary accordingly, based on the contracts, agreements and NDAs defined and signed between both the parties. So, in that sense the application of the table may change accordingly.

 

PCI DSS Requirements Responsibility Assignment of Management of Controls
  IaaS PaaS SaaS
1 Install and maintain a firewall configuration to protect cardholder data Both Both CSP
2 Do not use vendor-supplied defaults for system passwords and other security parameters Both  Both CSP
3. Protect stored cardholder data Both Both CSP
4. Encrypt transmission of cardholder data across open, public networks Client Both CSP
5. Use and regularly update anti-virus software or programs Client Both CSP
6. Develop and maintain secure systems and applications Both Both Both
7. Restrict access to cardholder data by businesses need to know Both Both Both
8. Assign a unique ID to each person with computer access Both Both Both
9. Restrict physical access to cardholder data CSP CSP CSP
10. Track and monitor all access to network resources and cardholder data Both Both CSP
11. Regularly test security systems and processes Both Both CSP
12. Maintain a policy that addresses information security for all personnel Both Both Both
PCI DSS Appendix A: Additional PCI DSS Requirements for Shared Hosting Providers CSP CSP CSP

Source: PCI Council

PCI DSS Compliance Requirements in Cloud

PCI DSS Compliance comprises 12 requirements that Merchants and Service Providers need to comply with. The standard applies to anyone who stores or processes cardholder data. This extends the applicability to even the third-party service providers including the Cloud Service Providers. So, now with the advent of PCI DSS 4.0, there are security controls and compliance requirements that have evolved in terms of introducing additional requirements, making certain security controls stringent, and having brought in flexibility in terms of allowance to adopt a customized approach to payment security. All of these evolved requirements should now be taken into consideration in the Cloud environment. So, elaborating on it we have shared the PCI Requirements specific to Cloud.

Build and Maintain a Secure Network and Systems

The payment systems and network need to be secured against unauthorized access by malicious

Individuals. This is to protect sensitive cardholder data and sensitive authentication data from any

Breach, theft, or comprise of the data.

Requirement 1: Install and Maintain Network Security Controls

Network Security Controls (NSCs), are security control technologies that help manage network traffic between physical network segments, based on pre-defined policies or rules. Network Security Controls like Firewalls that are generally an integral part of network security work as a front-end defense for protecting cardholder data. Deploying firewalls across all systems and networks within the card environment ensures protection against unauthorized access from an untrusted source, filtering the traffic entering (ingress) and leaving (egress) the network. Traditionally this functionality was provided by physical firewalls, but now it can be provided by virtual devices, cloud access controls, virtualization/container systems, and other software-defined networking technology as well. So, Cloud Service Providers are expected to implement adequate Network Security Controls to secure data and limit network access to and from the cardholder data environment across any computer network (public and private networks).

Requirement 2: Apply Secure Configurations to All Systems and Components

Using vendor-supplied defaults system passwords can be a huge threat to the systems in

Cardholder Data Environment. This is because defaults passwords are easy to hack and at times even available on public domains. So using default password settings and other security parameters will mean leaving the doors open for hackers to hack into systems. Generally, organizations verify and access cloud resources manually for identifying and validating cloud misconfigurations, default settings, and other security vulnerabilities. However, it is recommended that organizations implement measures with a practical approach and use advanced tools and software to check defaults configured and validate cloud security. Applying secure configurations to system components reduces the possibility of compromise by an attacker to systems. Changing default passwords, removing unnecessary software, functions, and accounts, and disabling or removing unnecessary services all help to reduce the potential attack surface.

Protect Account Data

Protecting account data is an important requirement in PCI DSS and both Merchants and Service

Providers are expected to meet this requirement. Cloud Service Providers must implement measures to ensure the prevention of unauthorized access to sensitive payment data or cardholder data. Protecting account data does not just mean ensuring the prevention of unauthorized access but also preventing data compromise.

Requirement 3: Protect Stored Account Data

Protection of stored account data is an essential requirement in PCI DSS and one way to ensure this is by limiting the storage of the data in the environment and limiting the retention period. Organizations are expected to follow a key rule which is not to store card data that is not needed or required for business. PCI DSS requires Cloud Service Providers to implement appropriate security measures that ensure the account data stored in the environment is safe. Further, the organization needs to ensure secure configuration and management of passwords, and encryption keys that are deployed to secure data. Cloud Service Providers are expected to implement security measures such as encryption, truncation, masking, and hashing that are critical components of account data protection.

Requirement 4: Protect Cardholder Data with Strong Cryptography During Transmission Over Open, Public Network Maintain a Vulnerability Management Program

Cryptography is the key to ensuring the data confidentiality, integrity, and security. So, encryption is one way of protecting cardholder data when in transit. PCI DSS requires Cloud Service Providers to encrypt data that is processed and in transit to prevent hackers from intercepting and accessing card data sent over open networks. For these reasons, organizations are expected to render the card data unreadable. Implementing strong encryption protocols such as TLS 1.2, SFTP, or IPSec as per PCI DSS becomes a mandate as per requirements. Further, the organization must maintain an inventory of the entity’s trusted keys and certificates used to protect PAN during transmission.

Requirement 5: Protect All Systems and Networks from Malicious Software

Malware can damage the system and compromise the confidentiality, integrity, or availability of the data, applications, or operating system. Malware can enter the network through the use of the Internet (public & private network), computer and mobile devices, and storage devices, resulting in unauthorized access, data theft, and compromise of data. So, it is recommended that organizations including the Cloud Service Providers use anti-malware solutions to address all the issues of malware and protect systems from current and evolving malware threats. Further, there must be measures in place to perform periodic scans to detect such malware.

Requirement 6: Develop and Maintain Secure Systems and Software

The applicability of PCI DSS requirements may vary from organization to organization and the types of cloud services offered. This simply means when using a managed service, the cloud user does not have any responsibilities in ensuring that the provider’s systems are secure. But in an IaaS and PaaS model, the merchants need to ensure that their Cloud Service Providers are tested for vulnerabilities in systems, apply security updates, and adopt secure development practices. PCI DSS requires verification of all code developed for public web applications, and implementation of a web application firewall (WAF) on all cloud resources that comprise or deal with sensitive cardholder data. Further appropriate software patches must be implemented, evaluated, and further tested sufficiently to ensure they do conflict with existing security configurations. Applying Software Lifecycle (SLC) Processes and Secure Coding techniques is crucial.

Implement Strong Access Control Measures

Ineffective access controls can result in unauthorized access to data and result in a data breach. So organizations must implement strong access controls with access rights granted on a need-to-know basis and ensure the least privilege based on job classification and function.

Requirement 7: Restrict Access to System Components & Cardholder Data by Business Need-to-Know

Access to cardholder data should be limited to only authorized individuals based on their roles and responsibilities. For this, merchants and service providers need to clearly define and document their roles and responsibilities. Access should be then accordingly granted based on a need-to-know basis to ensure the data is accessed by only authorized personnel. Higher number of access granted will inversely increase the risk exposure and chances of a data breach in the card environment. So access granted with the least privilege should be based on job classification and function. Further, all user accounts and related access privileges, including third-party/vendor must be reviewed every 6 months and documented to ensure user accounts and access remain appropriate based on job function.

Requirement 8: Identify Users and Authenticate Access to System Components

PCI DSS 4.0 requires measures specific to identifying and authenticating user access to sensitive systems and data.  This requires the implementation of Multifactor Authentication to secure access to systems components and to prevent misuse of data access. There is also a need for assigning unique user IDs to every individual having access to the data and CDE including the third-party Cloud Service Providers. Individuals accessing system components should be assigned a unique ID to ensure that the activities around the data are only performed by authorized users. Further, this ensures easy tracking and monitoring of activities in the environment and also ensures accountability on the part of the Cloud Service Providers having access to the card data. For this, merchants need to develop a secure password policy and share the same with Cloud Service Providers to ensure they are aware of the same and meet the requirements of the policy. The  Unique IDs for users and administrators should be managed throughout an account’s lifecycle.

Regularly Monitor Access to Networks and Data

Malicious Individuals can exploit vulnerabilities and loopholes in systems and networks connected with payment card applications and comprising cardholder data. So both Merchants and Service Providers must regularly monitor access networks to identify and remediate vulnerabilities. Tracking and monitoring access to cardholders can be achieved through logs.

Requirement 10: Log and Monitor All Access to Systems Component and Cardholder Data

Tracking and monitoring all access to system components and cardholder data must be achieved by maintaining a log. The process of logging is crucial for effective vulnerability management. The process facilitates thorough tracking, monitoring, and analysis of network and card data access especially when an incident occurs. If not it is extremely difficult to find the cause of the data breach in the card environment. The audit logs and monitoring process supports the detection and identifying anomalies and suspicious activities including forensic analysis of incidents and events. Further, these logs prevent destruction and unauthorized modifications of data. For these reasons, having Google Cloud logging metrics and alerts is essential for monitoring and tracking to meet the PCI DSS Requirement 10.

Requirement 11: Test Security of Systems and Networks Regularly

Organizations are expected to regularly perform security tests on systems and networks to identify vulnerabilities. For instance, all wireless access points need to be regularly tracked and monitored to identify vulnerabilities and unauthorized access points. So, with regular systems and network tests performed the network intrusions, unauthorized changes, and unexpected file changes can be immediately detected and addressed. For this, tests such as the Vulnerability Test and Penetration Tests must be regularly performed to identify exploitable vulnerabilities and security weaknesses. It is also important that the Cloud Service Providers ensure segmentation of CDE from other networks to ensure complete isolation and segregation of network comprising, transmitting sensitive data.

Source: PCI Council   

Key PCI DSS Considerations to account for in Cloud

PCI Council in its Guidelines for Cloud has clearly outlined certain considerations that must be thought through for ensuring PCI DSS Compliance. Given below are the key considerations explained.

Scoping Consideration

Merchants looking to collaborate with Cloud Service Providers must understand the security impact of this consideration on the cardholder data environment. Depending on the cloud deployment type, for instance, in private-cloud deployment, the organization can implement adequate segmentation to isolate in-scope systems from other systems and services or consider the entire cloud in scope for PCI DSS. Whereas in the public cloud, the Merchants and the Cloud Service Provider will need to work together to define scope boundaries and the roles and responsibilities towards data security as both parties will have their systems and services within the scope of PCI DSS.

Segmentation Considerations

Merchants availing Cloud Services need to ensure that using the public or shared cloud will require adequate isolation of the environment from the rest. Further isolation or segmentation of the environment may also be required at the Merchants CDE from other non-CDE components as well to reduce its PCI DSS scopeThe segmentation and isolation are required to be maintained at the network, operating system, application layers, and most importantly isolation of data stored. In a hybrid environment, the responsibility for segmentation is shared by the Cloud Service Provider and the Merchant. It is the Merchants responsibility to ensure that the device, application, or peering transit networks connecting to the Cloud Service Provider is secure.  Further, the Merchants must ensure isolation is maintained on their side of the CDE and by the Cloud Service Provider at all times.  For this, Merchants should conduct Penetration tests annually or after significant changes are introduced in the environment to ensure compliance (Requirement 11.4.5)

Understanding PCI DSS Responsibilities

Merchants will have to work with their Cloud Service Providers to define the roles and responsibilities in protecting card data. The responsibilities between Merchants and the Cloud Service Provider for meeting PCI DSS are based on various factors including the purpose of using the cloud service, the scope of PCI DSS outsourced to the Cloud Service Provider, services and system components that fall within the scope, Cloud service model opted by Merchant’s avail (IaaS, PaaS or SaaS) are some factors to be considered carefully. Merchants need to know and understand the scope of responsibility given and accepted by the Cloud Service Provider for each PCI DSS requirement, and the services and system components to be validated for each PCI requirement.  The roles and responsibilities need to be clearly defined to ensure both Merchants and Cloud Service Providers meet the requirements respectively without considering it to not be in their scope.

PCI DSS Responsibilities for Different Cloud Service Categories

PCI DSS Requirements are shared responsibilities between Merchants and Cloud Service Providers. Depending on the Cloud Service Model availed the responsibilities may either be shared or remain to be one’s individual responsibility. For most of the outsourced operations, Merchants will need to ensure maintaining and verifying the PCI DSS requirements are met and the Cloud Service Providers based on their roles and responsibility maintain and verify the requirement for its customers (Merchants). While certain aspects of the service functionality will be clear to the scope and define boundaries, there may be certain aspects that may result in an overlap of responsibilities. This needs to be clearly defined in the contract between the Merchant and Cloud Service Provider. So while it may be the responsibility of the Cloud Service Provider to meet certain requirements it is still the responsibility of the Merchants to monitor and ensure that the Service Provider meets the requirements and ensure ongoing compliance with all the applicable requirements. There must be records of the same verifying security controls are in place and there is ongoing compliance with PCI DSS. Merchants need to constantly ensure and validate their compliance in accordance with PCI DSS and the payment brand.

Source: PCI Council

Final Thought

Understanding the key requirements and considerations for PCI DSS in Cloud is crucial. Moreover, clearly defining roles and responsibilities and being aware of their own responsibility is essential for both Merchants and their Cloud Service Providers to meet PCI DSS Requirements and ensure compliance.

 

Author Bio

Narendra Sahoo (PCI QSA, PCI QPA, CISSP, CISA, and CRISC) is the Founder and Director of VISTA InfoSec, a global Information Security Consulting firm based in the United States, Singapore, UAE & India.

 

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