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Banking

TRANSFORMATION IS NON-NEGOTIABLE FOR BANKS LOOKING TO DELIVER VALUE IN A POST-PANDEMIC WORLD

Andrew Warren, Head of Banking & Financial Services, UK&I, Cognizant

 

In addition to responding to changing customer expectations, higher operating costs, new technology, and an evolving regulatory landscape, financial services organisations now also face the uniquely challenging business environment created by COVID-19. The economic consequences that are unfolding rapidly and unpredictably mean that banks must double-down on both their efficiency and customer experience agendas. In light of this, the need to modernise legacy banking platforms will gain sharper focus as banks emerge into the post COVID-19 landscape, driven by the need to focus on value for customers and agility to change and shift operations quickly.

 If banks are to remain strong and stable and make real progress with their efficiency and experience agendas, transformation is non-negotiable – but it can be risky and have high rates of failure. So how can banks pursue their transformation agenda, while addressing the very real risk that modernisation of legacy banking platforms presents?

 

Communicating value across the business

 Banking transformation may have traditionally been the domain of the IT function, but the impact on current and future value means it should be on the agenda of a much wider set of senior executives. This includes the CIO and COO but should also be as far reaching as the Chief Risk Officer, Chief Financial Officer, Chief Digital Officer, and Chief Experience Officer.

When we talk about value in the context of transformation it can mean multiple things. In monetary terms, transformation can reduce the total cost of a bank’s IT infrastructure, with legacy equipment 55 per cent more costly than cloud data. More importantly however, transformation often results in moving from highly manual orientated processes to more efficient, automated – and therefore accurate – processes. In turn this can lead to more informed and tailored products and services, internal process efficiencies, enhanced cybersecurity, advanced analytics, and reduced risk, especially around fraud and malicious activity. These all add significant value to customers, as well as operational and regulatory imperatives.

Furthermore, viewing transformation through a value lens should tie it to a range of specific financial and accounting metrics that ultimately measure success. That includes both those that reflect the protection and extension of current value, as well as measuring the extent to which transformation will support the capture of future value. Financial services organisations have a huge opportunity to create greater value for customers from innovation in products and services. Changing market dynamics are creating a basis upon which banks and others in the industry can evolve their offerings and organisations.

In much the same way as we have already seen in retail, for example with Amazon and AliBaba, and media platforms, such as Facebook and Netflix, customers are adjusting to a new way of banking that is changing expectations. To keep up, banks need to increasingly provide easy-to-use digital-first services across their products, as well as introduce new tools to help customers manage their money in the 21st century. And there is no doubt that the fall-out from COVID-19 will likely further drive the degree and extent of digital adoption.

Traditionally, financial institutions take many different approaches to transformation, such as developing sleek new customer experiences to compete or developing new platforms and partnering with fintechs. But achieving success for more mature banks is more challenging given the obstacles presented by their legacy platforms. Comprising complex, customised systems, these are expensive to run and very costly to change.

 

The inevitability of change

To truly transform operations and experience, many banks are now having to face up to the reality that they cannot move forward without banking platform transformation. That means they must – in one way or another – replace their historic systems with more modern, cost-effective, and flexible platforms. That is going to be essential to stand up the capabilities required to enable digital products and deliver the truly revolutionary experiences that customers demand.

Recognising this, many banks are now considering their options. Some have already started down the challenging path and hit bumps in the road. A very small number have successfully executed their ambition to create a platform for the future. All banks contemplating transformation should take lessons from both the successes and the mistakes. These will be critical to inform their plans.

 

What are the next steps?

There are a number of essential transformation steps to consider that will help realise value from investment as rapidly as possible, provide an appropriate level of delivery confidence and manage exposure to the operational risk normally associated with such changes. These include:

1. Business strategy must inform every step of transformation – ensure that the approach to platform transformation is tightly aligned to the wider business strategy.

 

2. Design a strategy-aligned roadmap for delivery – a transformation roadmap should clearly set out the logical order in which business outcomes will be delivered. Here again, that needs to align with the value that the organisation is seeking to achieve, with incremental progress determined by business priorities. This involves making appropriate use of modern delivery methods, such as agile, and making sure that everything that is done satisfies and is frequently assessed against the relevant value criteria.

 

3. Assess technology selection against business value – organisations often undertake detailed and exhaustive market, functional and technical assessments when reviewing new products and suppliers. This often means either the technical assessment dominates proceedings and / or new technology platforms are selected without a clear line of sight to the value required. Poor product selection is a risk as a result, as well as a lack of understanding of how products should be deployed to inform the sequence of delivery required by the transformation roadmap.

 

4. Assess your readiness for change – unsurprisingly, given the sheer scale and velocity of change that business leaders must deal with, resistance to change is often a key reason given for the failure of banking transformation projects. However, it is crucial that the ability of the organisation to deliver and adopt the operational, technical, and cultural changes required to support transformation is comprehensively assessed and done early.

The impact of COVID-19 paired with and the demands that financial services organisations face from all directions, make change an inevitable necessity for the most. The approach to delivering a successful banking transformation, underpinned by a modernised platform, will vary dramatically from bank to bank. However, above all, businesses need to ensure that value drives every aspect of change explicitly linking transformation strategy and investment with the realisation of value.

 

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Banking

WHY BANKS NEED TO EMBRACE OPEN SOURCE COMMUNITIES

Nikolai Stankau, Director Business Development, EMEA Financial Services at Red Hat, the world’s largest enterprise open source solutions provider.

 

Banks and financial services have long been benefiting from using open source software, which is code that is developed in a decentralised and collaborative way. Open source software is cost-effective, flexible, is developed rapidly, and tends to have more longevity than its proprietary peers because it is developed by communities rather than a single author or company.  According to Red Hat’s own research, 93% of IT leaders in financial services state that enterprise open source is important to their organisation.

Alongside adopting open source products, which many banks already do, there’s opportunity for these organisations to have a greater influence in the development of industry software, by engaging in ‘upstream’ open source community projects.

 

The advantages of engaging in upstream communities

In open source projects, code is developed as a shared process by a community of thinkers and developers anywhere in the world. Collaborating directly with these communities – what’s known as ‘upstream’ participation – can give banks a major competitive advantage on their journey to innovate. From there, software can either be downloaded at no cost, or consumed via a trusted open source vendor that secures and stabilises the software to make it suitable for an enterprise to use. This is also known as the ‘downstream’.

A company that contributes its developers’ time and resources to an open source community gets rewarded with the output of hundreds of developers working on the same code. This leads to a magnification effect, by virtue of the fact you’re expanding your team many times over while also benefiting from a much more diverse pool of talent. The result is that organisations can be captains of the product development process and work together with the community to design features and functionalities that meet their needs and keep up with customer demands.

An added benefit for banks engaging in these communities is it provides a great access point for sourcing new talent, as well as helping to retain existing talent. Developers are attracted to organisations that engage in upstream development because it allows them to be at the forefront of open source innovation and new community-led initiatives.

It’s common for multiple organisations in the industry to come together and collaborate on a project, which can drive significant benefits for the community as a whole. A good example is Fintech Open Source Foundation (FINOS), which is a community set up by banks to promote industry collaboration, by delivering software that addresses common industry challenges and drives faster innovation. The concept had its origins in Symphony, a open sourced messaging and collaboration tool that was adapted and improved upon by developers from other banks, ultimately helping the company to become a major business valued at around $1.4bn.

 

Where to join forces versus compete

Although the benefits of engaging in upstream communities are manifold, some organisations have concerns around intellectual property as well as the productivity of developers contributing to open source projects rather than exclusively working on the bank’s own proprietary software. To this latter point – in reality, the development of new solutions and features built inhouse often requires many months, whereas product ideas shared in a community setting can be executed in much shorter time frames. As the saying goes, many hands make light work.

Regarding the essential consideration of IP and competitiveness: a lot of where banks can differentiate is at the application layer; in the services they develop and offer, rather than at the underlying operating system or middleware foundations – these tend to be common and standard, and are what empowers organizations to get to market as fast as possible. Thus the greatest opportunity for banks lies in platforms such as Linux-based Kubernetes, which is now the industry standard for container orchestration and one of the most important technologies used in the financial services industry. Kubernetes attracts many contributors from diverse organisations all over the world.

Some IT leaders also recognise structural roadblocks: transitioning an organisation to new ways of thinking and operating is a process that isn’t achieved overnight. Not all banks have the legal or tech mechanisms in place to be able to share their code externally, and company policies can prevent their employees from engaging in open source communities. In a heavily regulated industry, it takes time for some organisations to create the necessary changes before they can harness the potential of upstream communities.

 

The future is open

As the software ecosystem expands, and in the face of accelerated digital transformation driven by the ‘new normal’ of the COVID-19 pandemic, banks and financial services have the opportunity to evaluate how they can get involved in open source. There are many ways to do this: they can invest financially in communities, provide technical leadership and resources, or contribute code. With organisations under more pressure than ever to gain a competitive advantage, playing a role in open source communities will help them create better products, speed up time to market and position themselves at the forefront of financial innovation.

 

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Banking

MORE THAN REGULATION – HOW PSD2 WILL BE A KEY DRIVING FORCE FOR AN OPEN BANKING FUTURE

Ralf Ohlhausen, Executive Advisor, at PPRO

 

Whilst initially seen as simply a regulation exercise, the second Payment Service Directive, also known as PSD2, has been a key driving force behind Open Banking, an initiative that presents a hopeful vision for the future of the financial services sector. Thanks to the advancement of technology, the payments industry is currently seeing disruption to legacy banking systems, and a move towards a world of Open Data. With Open Banking, third-party providers (TPPs) can offer customers a wealth of new and automated services beyond their standard bank offerings, such as what products to buy or even advice on who to bank with.

PSD2 has been created to ensure that banks create mechanisms to enable third-party providers (TPPs) to work securely, reliably and rapidly with the bank’s services and data on behalf of and with the consent of their customers. PSD2 requires EU member banks to give authorised, i.e. licensed TPPs, access to customers’ accounts either via Application Programme Interfaces (APIs) or their user interfaces. It also mandates the use of Strong Customer Authentication (SCA), which requires multiple factors of authentication from a customer to initiate electronic payments and grant access to transaction data.

Despite the progress of PSD2, however, there are still challenges to overcome to achieve widespread adoption and to meet Open Banking objectives. So, what are the current roadblocks that European banks and financial services need to overcome to make Open Banking a beneficial reality for all?

 

Ralf Ohlhausen

Delays to API development

A crucial factor standing in the way of the acceleration towards Open Banking has been the delay to API development. These APIs are the technology that TPPs rely on to migrate their services and customer base to remain PSD2 compliant.

One of the contributing factors was that the RTS, which apply to PSD2, left room for too many different interpretations. This ambiguity caused banks to slip behind and delay the creation of their APIs. This delay hindered European TPPs in migrating their services without losing their customer base, particularly outside the UK, where there has been no regulatory extension and where the API framework is the least advanced.

 

A lack of awareness

Levels of awareness of the new regulations and changes to how customers access bank accounts and make online payments are very low among consumers and merchants. This leads to confusion and distrust of the authentication process in advance of the SCA roll-out. Moreover, because the majority of customers don’t know about Open Banking yet, they aren’t aware of the benefits. Without customer awareness and demand it may be very hard for TPPs to generate interest and uptake for their products.

Recently some regulators and banks, such as the Central Bank of Ireland, have made decent efforts to raise awareness of the changes with PSD2 campaigns. But it isn’t reaching the general public. When it does, it’s often because of scaremongering or fear, uncertainty and doubts around data security fuelled by incumbents to protect their business. This also isn’t the right way to approach the issue as it will lead to people being more afraid, rather than aware. Instead, it is the role of payment service providers to educate their customers about Open Banking requests or opportunities, to ensure the public are aware of the changes to payment authentication procedures when SCA comes into play and are empowered to move their data.

TPPs have a real vested interest in getting customers on board with Open Banking. They should build on their customer relationships to grow trust and raise levels of education around the changes. When customers sign up for a new service, TPPs need to tell them explicitly what to expect before they have to do it, plus what explicit consent is required to access their account information in exchange for value-added services.

 

Outweighing the challenges with opportunities

Although the introduction of the PSD2 regulation hasn’t been seamless for the banking and fintech industry, it is set to offer many benefits and advantages for the end-customer, and the financial industry. In fact, the regulation will create an integrated and frictionless European payments system, that will provide the customer with more choice, control and security over their finances than ever before.

One of PSD2’s primary goals is to provide greater protection against fraud for banking customers, who may have previously been open to risk through weak authentication and unregulated data-sharing practices. The new rules insist on enhanced security requirements, including the use of Strong Customer Authentication (SCA) to protect customers while making electronic payments.

Furthermore, TPPs unencumbered by legacy technology have long been able to innovate faster than traditional banks. Now, this regulation will provide regulated and secure access to customer data, allowing them to develop products even more quickly. The new regulation also promotes technology on a European level and encourages fintechs to do what they do best: innovate.

It’s also important to not forget that PSD2 regulation increases market competition allowing customers to choose a wider range of suppliers for their banking and payment services without having to switch their bank for that. The decoupling of banking services from the underlying account infrastructure will make it easier for customers to opt for the banking services that best fit their needs. It also increases the number of financial providers, services and products which customers will be able to choose from.

 

The future of Open Banking

The financial services landscape is becoming a firmly consumer-centric environment. Across the UK and Europe, we’ll continue to see the rollout of technologies that put control in the hands of consumers. Open Banking will be pivotal in its role, opening up new avenues and opportunities for both banks and payment service providers (PSPs).

Thanks to Open Banking, the ability to share data securely in the retail banking sector has led to a sophisticated ecosystem where the customer is in charge of their payments and choice of banking services. Over the next decade, we should expect to see the same level of transformation in our digital services and data sharing, leading to a complete rebalance of services where customers will be able to actively own their data and use it the way they like.

Europe is currently leading the Open Banking race, so the successful implementation of PSD2 and SCA is extremely important to maintain the lead and build a future with Open Finance and Open Data as well.

 

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