Connect with us

Interviews

GOING FOR INVESTMENT IN CENTRAL EUROPE: START-UP LIFE OUTSIDE A TRADITIONAL TECH HUB

A Q&A with Bence Jendruszak, Co-founder and COO at SEON

 

  1. At what stage did you realise you were going to need an investor onboard?

During the early stages of the development (when completing our minimum viable product), we managed secure a Central European payment gateway in order to start using our system (free of charge). From this point on our product development was user feedback driven. It was at this stage, that we realised that our product has gained enough proof of concept, that we were ready to pitch the idea to investors.

 

  1. How important was the investment to getting your business to the current point?

Our pre-seed investment (50k EUR in January of 2017) was the initial kick-start to arriving to the current point. That micro-investment allowed myself and Tamas (Co-founder and CEO or SEON) to start working on the project full time and also to scale up the development team (from freelancers to full time programmers).

 

  1. How did you start the process of looking for an investor? 

We started by setting up our very first pitch deck. Of course, a lot of market analysis and USP shaping went into this. Once we had our first deck, we started contacting investors and started pitching the project to them. That specific pitch deck was very different to what the current version looks like.

 

  1. Were you aware of the challenges you could potentially face as a tech start-up in CE?

We were very well aware of the challenges. The European investment mentality is different than that of the US investment mentality, for example. Investors tend to be more conservative in the EU. Now imagine what the investment mentality may be like in the CE region. Nevertheless, we were also aware of the advantages of setting up a tech start-up in the CE region. The talent pool of

engineers and the cost of labour is by far the best in our home-turf – so the challenge was worthwhile.

 

  1. What was your journey to finding an investor like? Challenges / milestones?

Initially, we were faced with multiple unacceptable deals. The terms and conditions weren’t right for us in the long term. We were always aware that in order to build an international start-up (that would later develop into a scale-up), we had to on-board investors that we were fully comfortable to cooperate with – and vice versa. We needed to be on the same page and have a shared vision for SEON’s future.

 

  1. How did you find your lead investor, Portfolion? What else do they offer in addition to financial investment? (international network etc.)

We met them by introduction from an acquaintance. Portfolion is a well renowned VC in the CE region. They seemed like a partner that we could on-board into our boat and we could steer the ship together with them. They are the subsidiary of OTP Bank, one of the largest banks in the CE region. A potential gateway to partnering with a major bank seemed like a mutually beneficial setup. Aside from receiving a financial investment from the fintech fund of Portfolion, we can happily say that we are providing our fraud prevention services to OTP Bank as of today.

 

  1. What have you learned about the investor landscape in CE?

We found out that European investors are even more sceptical when it comes to CEE countries. They tend to avoid start-ups that aren’t located in hubs like Berlin or London. For them, Hungary is still seen as a former Eastern bloc country playing catch up with the rest of Europe in terms of living standards and infrastructure.

That said, there are a lot of investors in the region, but you really have to focus on getting in touch with the right organization. Onboarding an investor is a long-term partnership, there has to be a fundamental alignment in terms of the vision and mission of the two teams. We believe that we’ve managed to partner with investors who share the same vision and mission as us (up to date).

 

  1. What role will investment play in the next growth stage of the SEON?

 The next growth stage is focused on international expansion. We will be seeking an investor that can provide not only funds, but also somebody that has a solid portfolio of fintech companies and a partner network of financial institutions.

 

  1. Do you have any advice for other businesses in your position that are looking for funding in the CE region?

Do not rush into any deal that is in front of you, time is on your side. If you are in an early stage, make sure to approach as many investors as possible, in order to be able benchmark each opportunity.

 

Interviews

EVOLUTION OF THE LIFE INSURANCE INDUSTRY

by Samantha Chow, LAH Markets Lead at EIS

1.  What problems does the life insurance industry face when it comes to data?  

The most significant problem that life insurers face is how they use data and how it is spread amongst multiple legacy systems.  Sometimes the data is split over at least 25 different legacy systems all through the business.

This data is also typically defined differently between disparate systems. For example, in one system of record, the policy number may be the key identifier for a policy, and in another system, it could be the national insurance number. This makes it extremely difficult to pull data together to get a clear picture of an individual’s policy life cycle or journey.   

Without understanding what the entire journey looks like, tools like AI and ML are only superficial. These tools can only work in situations when it has unhindered access to all the information, during the underwriting and onboarding process, for example.   

With modern core technology, life insurers are able to integrate legacy systems through open API architecture and provide an all-around view of the customer. 

2.       Why is data quality an extensive challenge for the life insurance industry?  

The data is often fragmented and stored in separate blocks for each piece of software being used. For example, claims need access to a data centre in order to access underwriting data for the claims review process. With this data often being disparate over various areas, most of it is recorded manually. 

We are now starting to see the automation of applications and a movement from paper to electronic, but this isn’t happening enough to improve the not in good order challenges (NIGO) that life and annuity providers experience.   

The amount of manual data entry that still occurs creates immediate challenges and challenges that arise later down the line. The mistakes made in the application process will haunt the insurer down the road when it comes to the likes of billing, payments and claims.   

However, life insurers can use solutions such as LexisNexis Risk Solutions or Equifax to help with the onboarding process. These are great solutions and can check for any potential inaccuracies in the customer’s address, telephone number and finances. With that being said, insurance carriers’ archaic legacy systems will still leave space for manual errors, with some even leading to fines. 

3.       How has technology impacted life insurers?   

With 59% of insurers upping digital transformation spend this year, it is clear that they understand how important technology and automation are. However, insurers tend to have outdated legacy and modern legacy solutions, which slow down the insurer’s response to product development and changes.

Insurers will need the technology platform that follows the coretech model to enable an ecosystem to meet customers anywhere, any way they wish, with the products that are fitting for their personal needs, and predict and act quickly in the face of unforeseen circumstances. The emergence of insurtechs, spurred by the development and capabilities of new technology, has enabled insurance firms to future-proof their businesses and provided them with the opportunity to create new value propositions based on the modern customer’s needs.  

Achieving large-scale cost reduction is a significant aim for life insurers and automating manual tasks and simplifying processes will help them reach that point faster. This way, life insurers can achieve substantial advantages and reduce errors caused by human intervention.

4.       Does an ecosystem help life insurers to build their business for the future? If so, how?

Becoming part of a partner ecosystem can help life insurers offer a portfolio of different products and services. This includes capabilities from adjacent industries, technology giants, and the emerging insurtech community. Ecosystems allow insurers to create their own unique fingerprint in the industry while being more flexible to change and evolving as their customers do.

A strong ecosystem provides insurers the opportunity to be proactive, rather than reactive. It gives them to tools that provide the insurer the opportunity to personalise their business to the individual customer and product level and build relationships with their customers. If insurers want to become more innovative, they must continue to produce new products and services for their customers. Transitioning from the “one-and-done” sale to a more interactive, always-on relationship will create expanded revenue opportunities through long-term relationships and brand loyalty.

Continue Reading

Interviews

‘GLOBAL TRADE IN 2008 VS 2021: GLOBAL IMPACT, DIFFERENT CHALLENGES’

A Q&A with Nawaz Ali Head of Insights at Western Union Business Solutions who draws comparisons between the financial crisis of 2008 and the coronavirus pandemic and provides some insight into how businesses can better plan for the year ahead.

 

2020 has been a tumultuous year for global trade with many drawing comparisons to the financial crash of 2008, how do you think the two crises compare?

Though both crises were global in nature and had far reaching impacts worldwide, it is important to note that the dynamics of today’s global trade have shifted in the past 12 years. Today, faster digital transformation can help enable the global services trade to counterbalance some of the impact of the protectionist policies, which we typically witness in times of crisis, on the global goods trade.

Even so, the recovery of global trade could still be very gradual as these more protectionist behaviours could also keep trade activity near to its lowest level over the past 10 years.

Unlike in 2008, this time both global supply and demand factors are at play, so the effects could last longer. Furthermore, this time around the crisis is broad and impacting all sectors whereas in 2008, the crisis was more concentrated in the banking sector.

The recent vaccine developments have been an important turning point, and we’ve seen an immediate positive impact if, for example, you look towards the recent spike in commodity prices. However,  global demand could still remain distressed  in 2021 due to  corporate insolvency risks and weaker purchasing power of consumers.

Similar to 2008, global interest rates have been cut to new historic lows by central banks which should underpin investment and support the recovery. However, the key factor for any recovery actually lies more in the mass development and distribution of the COVID-19 vaccine, and it is that uncertainty which spurred governments into also launching record amounts of fiscal stimulus.

Nevertheless, by putting the right plans in place for 2021 businesses will be able to better equip themselves to recover from the pandemic.

 

When a crisis hits, typically investors rush to safe-haven currencies to minimise their losses. Could this have a different impact today when compared to 2008?

Yes, the geopolitical differences between now and 2008 are stark. Today, the first signs of a capital rotation into risk-prone assets are emerging. With the US-Sino trade war, domestic mismanagement of COVID-19 in the US, and rising global geopolitical tensions, now could be the beginning of a major multi‑year global FX regime change as investors start to look for alternatives for the greenback.

Despite the fact investors have failed to find a credible substitute for the dollar since 2010, in this volatile environment it is critical that businesses ensure they understand their FX exposure and have plans in place for every potential scenario.

There is a disconnect between stock markets and the economy. Investors remain optimistic about the economic turnaround on the horizon, but the reality is far from certain. If the risk of long‑term economic damage rises, this optimism will likely fade and weigh on risk‑friendly currencies, including Sterling, and boost safe-havens like the Japanese Yen and Swiss Franc.

In short, with global interest rates converging, proper crisis management and economic growth differentials could overhaul the balance of power on the world stage after the recession.

 

Aside from the coronavirus pandemic, what other marquee events should businesses be planning around in 2021?

Of course, there are many other seismic geopolitical issues that should be taken into account when planning for 2021, which will have significant impacts on currency markets, such as Brexit, US-UK trade negotiations and regime change following the US election result – a Joe Biden presidency could have a material impact on the global trade environment.

Analysing the Brexit example alone, in a world gripped by virus-related supply chain disruption and growth concerns, a no-trade deal Brexit could exacerbate the economic shock. There are currently no tariffs on trade between the UK and EU and if a  trade deal or an extension of talks is not in place by Dec. 31, 2020, resulting barriers to trade could significantly harm export and import business and further damage any economic recovery.

Herein, the importance of a business evaluating the risks and opportunities related to the ongoing disruption in global trade on a more regular basis cannot be understated.

 

How can companies be better prepared for these challenges going into 2021?

The rise of geopolitical themes such as trade wars, and the growing influence of political figures on financial markets, has significantly increased the complexity around judging future market trends and their implications for international business. We discuss how businesses can better prepare for some of the most topical challenges  in our Are you Ready for 2021? guide.

 In summary, regardless of a businesses’ goals, understanding their FX risk and exposure should be part of every businesses strategy so that they can better pivot at speed and at scale in times of crises and minimise potential damage to their business.

 

Continue Reading

Magazine

Trending

Finance11 hours ago

WHY SUBSCRIPTIONS ARE KEY TO THE FUTURE OF THE FINANCIAL SERVICES SECTOR

Michael Mansard, Principal Director – Subscription Strategy at  Zuora   The business world is wondering: what does post-pandemic growth look...

Banking11 hours ago

MODERN BANK HEISTS: FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS ARE BEING HELD HOSTAGE

By Tom Kellermann, Head of Cybersecurity Strategy, VMware Security Business Unit, @TAKellermann   The modern bank heist has escalated to...

Finance11 hours ago

FUTURE-PROOFING FOR THE FINTECH INDUSTRY WITH NETWORK INNOVATION

Alan Hayward, Sales & Marketing Manager at SEH Technology   As the years pass, it is becoming far more difficult...

News11 hours ago

HSBC JOINS BIAN TO COLLABORATE ON IT ARCHITECTURE DEVELOPMENT

The global bank brings an international perspective to the not-for-profit organisation   BIAN, the independent not-for-profit, and HSBC today announce that...

Business11 hours ago

FASTER REACTIVITY TO END-OF-LIFE DEADLINES IS KEY TO COMPLIANCE

Mat Clothier, CEO, Cloudhouse   Across global industries, the financial services sector is among the most regulated. Ensuring compliance is...

Finance11 hours ago

HOW DOES THE CREDIT CARD TOKENIZATION WORK?

Narendra Sahoo, Founder and Director of VISTA InfoSec    Credit card tokenization is the process of completely replacing sensitive data...

News11 hours ago

DELOITTE ADVISES AL FALEH EDUCATIONAL HOLDING ON ITS DEBUT LISTING ON THE VENTURE MARKET OF QATAR STOCK EXCHANGE

Deloitte Middle East acted as the listing advisor for Al Faleh Educational Holding Q.P.S.C. (Al Faleh) for listing of 240...

Business4 days ago

PUTTING TECHNOLOGY AND EMPATHY AT THE HEART OF SMB LOAN SERVICING

Luis Huerta, Vice President and Intelligent Automation Practice Head, Europe at Firstsource By the end of March 2021, over one...

Finance5 days ago

THE PUSH AND PULL OF IDENTITY SECURITY ADOPTION IN THE FINANCIAL SERVICES INDUSTRY

Ben Bulpett, Director, SailPoint There is a dual movement spurring on the adoption of identity security in the financial services...

News5 days ago

GENIUS GROUP LAUNCHES 4-WEEK INVESTMENT MICROSCHOOL FOR ENTREPRENEURS TO BUILD A FUTURE-PROOF INVESTMENT PORTFOLIO

In response to the increased volatility in the global financial markets created by the Covid-19 pandemic, Genius Group is launching...

Business6 days ago

THE SPAC BOOM: WHY COMPANIES AND INVESTORS ARE INCREASINGLY LOOKING TOWARDS SPAC IPOs

Maxim Manturov, Head of Investment Research at Freedom Finance Europe Special purpose acquisition companies (SPACs) have long been part of the...

News6 days ago

HARDSOFT KEEPS CUSTOMERS CONNECTED WITH BLOCK DISCOUNTING FROM SIEMENS FINANCIAL SERVICES

One-stop leasing and IT solution expert HardSoft Ltd has expanded its offering with Block Discounting from Siemens Financial Services (SFS)....

Business6 days ago

5 REASONS SMALL BUSINESS OWNERS NEED FINANCIAL ADVISING

With everything else a small business owner has to deal with daily, having a financial advisor to help keep both...

News6 days ago

JSCRAMBLER X DOTCONNECT: JSCRAMBLER ENABLES THE SECURE DELIVERY OF DIGITAL BANKING SOLUTIONS FOR TWO OF THE FASTEST GROWING BANKS IN THE UK

-dotConnect successfully applied Jscrambler during the delivery of digital banking solutions for Al Rayan Bank and UBL UK- -73% of...

Business6 days ago

IT’S TIME SPECIALIST BUILDING SOCIETIES, LENDERS AND BANKS JOINED THE INSTANT ECONOMY

By Andrew Dellow, Director of Strategic Accounts at Modulr, the payments platform. Building societies, lenders and other specialist banks are...

Technology6 days ago

THE FINTECH REVOLUTION: BALANCING INNOVATION AND SECURITY

By Altaz Valani, Director of Insights Research at Security Compass. At a time of significant disruption for the financial services industry, a...

Business7 days ago

THE EVOLUTION OF BUSINESS TRAVEL ACCOMMODATION

By Cherry Wang, Country Manager, UK & Ireland, Homelike. Business travel accommodation is undergoing drastic changes as the sector moves...

Business7 days ago

HOW NEW DATA SOURCES CAN ACCELERATE OUR JOURNEY TO RECOVERY

Jonathan Westley, Chief Data Officer, at Experian UK&I With the growth of e-commerce and streaming of everything from music to...

Business7 days ago

TOP 5 INVESTMENT TRENDS THAT WILL SKYROCKET IN 2021

By Roger James Hamilton, Founder and CEO of Genius Group Since March 2020 we have seen unprecedented movements in the...

Technology7 days ago

GETTING THE TIMING RIGHT FOR CLOUD

Daily life has changed a lot in the past year. Decades of innovation have occurred in mere months, as industries...

Trending