Connect with us

Banking

Banking in 2035: Trust, climate risks and geopolitical rivalry shape a purpose-driven industry, forecasts study

Published

on

A new SAS-sponsored study by Economist Impact predicts three potential futures for banking, examining the risks and opportunities ahead

As disruptive forces roil today’s financial sector, banking execs are scrutinising the evolving role of banks in the most competitive market they’ve ever faced. What does the future hold? And how can they meet the challenges ahead to forge a brighter future – both for the industry and the greater world? Such is the focus of a new future of banking study, Banking in 2035: three possible futures, by Economist Impact and sponsored by AI and analytics leader SAS.

The first in a two-part study, the report presents three possible scenarios for the 2035 banking landscape. Through extensive desk research and expert interviews, Economist Impact’s analysis:

  • Snapshots the “megatrends” primed to resculpt the banking landscape over the next decade.

  • Uncovers risks and opportunities presented in different combinations of trends.

  • Highlights specific ways banks can evolve to support a more equitable, ethical and sustainable future.

In confronting quandaries like climate change, economic fragmentation, and pervasive economic and social inequities, the study is clear: Banks face a defining moment.

“The sector’s rapid evolution amidst prevailing uncertainty begs a fundamental question: What is the purpose of banks?” said Yuxin Lin, Senior Manager of Policy and Insights at Economist Impact. “How banking leaders answer this question – and the business decisions they make as a result – will redefine the entire industry.”

“Banks have the power to elevate not just our global economy but all of humankind,” said Alex Kwiatkowski, Director of Global Financial Services at SAS. “By embracing technology and innovation with intention, banks can pave a more purpose-driven path, where higher purpose and profitability go hand-in-hand. And if they don’t embrace this fully, a golden opportunity to make a genuine difference will be squandered, potentially with very serious consequences.”

Scenario 1: Can transformed banks regain public trust?

Since the 2008 financial crisis, banks have faced reputational trouble. In fact, financial services consistently ranks among the least trustworthy sectors, currently inspiring confidence in just over half (54%) of the public, according to the 2022 Edelman Trust Barometer.

Flashing forward to 2035, Scenario 1 envisions a world where banks wield digital transformation to rehabilitate their image. Banks have strengthened data privacy and cyber fraud safeguards and championed consumer-focused regulation. Greater transparency and consumer protections buoy public trust, fuelling open banking and partnerships that ignite lucrative new offerings. Digital platforms frictionlessly unify every facet of customers’ financial lives in personalised, customisable ways.

“Consumer trust, built over many years, can be lost in an instant,” said Stu Bradley, Senior Vice President of Fraud and Security Intelligence at SAS. “As digitalisation accelerates, it is critical that banks create hyper-personalised engagement as they address rising risks. In balancing customer experience and risk, an enterprise decisioning approach – where fraud, risk and engagement decisions integrate holistically across the customer journey – can cut costs and streamline banks’ IT infrastructures, while boosting revenue and customer retention.”

Scenario 2: Might banks catalyse cross-industry climate action and power the green transition?

Addressing the climate crisis will require unprecedented global cooperation and collaboration. According to the United Nations, governments’ current commitments for reducing greenhouse gas emissions fall far short of what’s needed to limit global warming to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels. Averting the worst impacts of climate change demands quick, decisive action.

Scenario 2 foresees a global community committed to climate action in 2035, where decarbonisation is a foremost consideration across energy, infrastructure and transportation. Cities have been redesigned for energy efficiency and climate resiliency. Cost-effective renewable energy sources and green technologies are the norm.

“Climate leadership in the banking sector will drive greater cross-industry progress toward net-zero emissions by 2050 – and it starts now with better analytics, modelling and management of climate risk,” said Troy Haines, Senior Vice President and Head of Risk Research and Quantitative Solutions at SAS. “In enhancing their ability to model climate risk scenarios and understand potential impacts to their balance sheets and capital, banks can help propel the green transition and advance worldwide climate resilience.”

Scenario 3: How will banks fare in a geopolitically fragmented world?

Even as the world tries to put the worst of COVID-19 in the rearview mirror, economic and market uncertainties abound. The pandemic’s aftereffects have magnified tensions between the world’s economic superpowers while overburdening developing ones, whose populations suffer outsized consequences.

Against this backdrop, it isn’t hard to imagine Scenario 3, which depicts a geopolitically contentious world stage in 2035, coloured by divergent interests and a retreat of multilateralism among the world’s economic giants. Bilateral and regional agreements have supplanted the World Trade Organization. The global financial system has been fractured by rivals’ alternative payment systems and the rise of digital currencies.

“Deglobalisation, accelerated by recent global events, will likely widen the staggering societal inequalities that plague us today,” said Theodora Lau, Founder of Unconventional Ventures. “Indisputably, banking and money are at the heart of it all. Each of us has a role to play in championing a more inclusive and sustainable future with our actions of today.”

Reimagining banking for the 21st century – at Sibos and everywhere

Lau, also a renowned author, speaker and industry commentator, will join SAS’ Kwiatkowski on the Meet the Experts stage at next week’s Sibos conference in Amsterdam. The duo will delve into the study at their joint session, Embedding Generosity Into the Global Economy, on Wednesday, Oct. 12, at 12:30 p.m. CEST.

Attendees can also engage with SAS throughout the conference at Sibos Booth B115.

SAS will debut part two of this future of banking study in November. Banking in 2035: global banking survey report will explore the results of an international survey of banking industry professionals. In the meantime, learn how better insights beget better banking at SAS.com/betterbanking.

Banking

How Banks Can Boost App Innovation, Speed and Compliance

Published

on

By

Steve Barrett, Senior Vice President of International Operations, Delphix 

As new finance and banking applications disrupt the market each day, and customer expectations around speed, privacy and quality continue to grow, financial organization CIOs and DevOps teams have to innovate quickly to bring new apps and updates to market, while remaining strictly compliant to a myriad of regulations. DevOps innovation in financial services requires fast access to accurate, compliant test data, and as anyone who touches the industry knows, data privacy is a highly complex, critical process woven into the everyday world of finance.

Banks and financial services organizations collect vast amounts of data, but using that data for innovation can be challenging due to the vast size and complexity of test data. These challenges can inhibit the adoption of new and transformative technologies and hinder innovation if they are not addressed head on. To address these challenges, many organizations are integrating the use of highly innovative test data management (TDM) tools within their DevOps ecosystems. DevOps TDM provides access and delivery of lightweight, compliant data for DevOps initiatives including digital transformation, software upgrades, cloud migration, artificial intelligence and machine learning (AI/ML), and analytics.

Data – the last automation frontier

Historically, application teams manufactured data for development and testing in a siloed, unstructured fashion. Over time, large IT organizations began consolidating TDM functions to take advantage of innovative tools to create test data. With the rise of modern development methodologies like DevOps and CI/CD that demand fast, iterative release cycles and end-to-end API-driven automation, legacy TDM approaches are often no longer sufficient.

Reliance on a traditionally manual, ticket-driven, request-fulfill model creates time drains during test cycles and slows the pace of application delivery. Consider the payments industry, in which agile technology companies using optimized DevOps processes can release new code hundreds of times per month. In contrast, traditional banks with slow IT ticketing systems may take months to release new features. These manual, legacy TDM approaches exist in contradiction with modern DevOps practices and CI/CD processes that depend on automation and fast feedback to development teams.

TDM for the DevOps Era

DevOps teams rely on TDM to evaluate the performance, functionality and security of applications. However, while processes including storage, compute, and code have all been automated, data has eluded the reach of most DevOps toolchains.

Now, DevOps TDM can help accelerate app releases and increase compliance.by automating the delivery, provisioning, and compliance of data. These practices provide both development and testing teams with data APIs, including the ability to refresh, rewind, bookmark, group, tag, branch, and share test data, to accelerate DevOps productivity and improve application quality. DevOps TDM also includes copying production data, and the masking (anonymization) and virtualization of data through the DevOps pipeline, which helps accelerate app releases and increase compliance.

And as the pace of application development quickens, so does the pace of privacy regulations and efficiently ensuring compliance in DevOps has become a significant challenge for enterprises. Non-production data used for testing software applications, reporting, and analytics can contain up to 80% of an enterprise’s sensitive data. To solve this, DevOps TDM provides integrated data masking to de-identify personally identifiable information (PII) and other sensitive data in non-production environments, eliminating the risk of sensitive data exposure.

The World Quality Report 2022-2023[1] by Capgemini stressed the importance of an enterprise wide approach to test data provisioning (a core component of TDM). The report states, “Over the years, with stringent regulatory and security requirements around data, organizations have increased their focus on provisioning test data safely and securely.”

The report shows that secure test data provisioning remains a challenge, with only 20% of respondents having a fully-implemented enterprise test data provisioning strategy in place to address security and compliance requirements.

Data is the catalyst to innovation

Automation is fueling myriad digital transformations within the financial services sector, but without the right data, these application innovations cannot succeed. DevOps TDM can help further accelerate DevOps initiatives by automatically delivering fresh, complete, and secure test data wherever and whenever it is needed, in minutes. With DevOps TDM, banks and financial institutions can innovate faster, reduce time-to-market for updating legacy applications, and accelerate development and testing of disruptive fintech.

 

[1] Source: https://www.capgemini.com/insights/research-library/world-quality-report-wqr-2022/

Continue Reading

Banking

Is traditional business banking the best option for SME finance squeezes?

Published

on

By

Airto Vienola, CEO, AREX Markets 

The pressures facing business and personal finances alike have been well documented.

Stories are now starting to emerge about how smaller enterprises around the UK – which make up well over 90% of the companies in the country – are coping with that mounting stress. The picture starting to emerge suggests, not well.

Personal borrowing is bridging gaps in business books

One survey released recently suggested that one in five of the country’s small businesses have taken out personal loans by the business owner to try to cover gaps in their incomes and profit margins. A further 43% said they were considering doing the same. This rush to secure additional funds by any means may be understandable for businesses feeling the pinch, but it’s neither sustainable nor savvy. Many of these enterprises are already burdened with additional debt from the Covid relief scheme, and given rising interest rates, soaring energy costs and rising cost of goods, taking on additional debt is not an attractive prospect. Add to that the fact that rates from traditional business banking providers are proving steep, smaller enterprises could be forgiven for looking to personal means to shore up the balance sheet. A recent study from members of the Federation of Small Businesses found that one in five small businesses are struggling to find business lending rates under 11%. To help these companies to survive, something clearly has to give.

Not all Alt-Fi options are equal

Alternative finance services have been proliferating in recent times, and yet almost half of small business operators have concerns about pursuing this option, despite actively seeking additional funding support. Clarity over terms and conditions is an often-cited reason for this reticence, which is only natural when undertaking proper due diligence on financial lending. This is a wise choice, especially as it has become so easy for business owners to quickly and simply access new services through embedded finance services, just a few clicks away on existing digital accounting and bookkeeping services. Many of these are still not clear about any detailed fine print, lengthy contract terms or potentially high fees, and yet these too can look like accessible and viable options to business owners facing mounting financial issues.So, it can be hard to pick the right provider without a lot of research. Those wary of the long tail of taking on debt should be particularly careful when it comes to business Buy Now Pay Later or BNPL offers, which are currently entering the UK market, though that isn’t to say that other alternative financing services won’t suit their specific needs whilst mitigating fears over risk.

A fresh perspective on an established technique

So, if debt should not be an option, and embedded finance can have downsides, where should SMEs turn if they don’t want to kick the can of cashflow problems just a few months down the road? One area to reevaluate, which has seen a tremendous shift given the fresh thinking from alternative finance is invoice financing or spot factoring. No longer the imbalanced option of last resort it was traditionally perceived to be, the option has become much fairer to the SME, in addition to providing a swifter and more flexible alternative. In years gone by, invoice financing was the purview of the banks, which led to low rates of return for businesses looking to unlock the value in their organisation, and often much better value flowing back instead to the lender taking on the risk. This is no longer the case. Likewise, invoice financing earned a bad reputation among some for tying businesses into lengthy contracts – another area which current services in the market have since addressed. Our service for example allows businesses the flexibility to access cash back on just a single invoice of their choosing – which could be the difference for struggling SMEs between dipping into loss or keeping the lights on.

One answer to the late payments problem?

Perhaps the most important area which services like invoice financing assist is overdue invoices – the bane of the British SME. Barclays claimed earlier this year that over a quarter of SMEs are finding late payments to be on the increase, and this was an already notorious issue for many business owners. Estimates show that SMEs on average have £6500 in unpaid invoices at any given time. Financing these invoices ensures that the cashflow of these strapped SMEs is healthier, gets the money back into the business without the concerns of lengthy payment terms or endless chasing, and certainly in our case, has no impact on the relationship with the other organisation. Our platform acts as a marketplace between SME and likely investors, with extensive insight provided to make sure that those investing in the invoice are matched to the right businesses. We take on the intermediate risk – removing any suggestion or potential concerns around unwanted debt collection, for additional business owner peace of mind.

While the pressures may be mounting on the SMEs around the country, one thing is clear. No business should rush into making long term financial decisions simply as the cashflow is drying up. Any savvy business would be well advised to make sure they understand the implications, short and long term, of any lending solution they look to employ. However, knowing that there are options and the business’ bottom line does not simply have to rely on traditional banking services, should provide business owners with a lot more options at their disposal to help them to face the coming months with greater cash liquidity confidence.

Continue Reading

Magazine

Trending

Business13 hours ago

Ransomware chokes COBRA: How AI-powered data analysis can support financial services’ plight

By Toby Butler, Financial Crime Solutions Manager at Ripjar   Ransomware attacks are on the increase in the United Kingdom....

Banking20 hours ago

How Banks Can Boost App Innovation, Speed and Compliance

Steve Barrett, Senior Vice President of International Operations, Delphix  As new finance and banking applications disrupt the market each day,...

Business20 hours ago

SVEA BANK ACQUIRES AREX’S FINTECH OPERATION IN FINLAND

AREX Markets, the data-driven FinTech company that drives financing costs down for SMEs and enables them to get paid quicker, has...

News20 hours ago

ICICI Lombard and AU Small Finance Bank announce Bancassurance tie-up

ICICI Lombard General Insurance, India’s leading private sector non-life insurance company, is entering into a Bancassurance tie-up with AU Small Finance Bank....

Finance21 hours ago

Crypto’s tipping point

Chris George, Senior VP of Product at Somo argues that Crypto needs to improve its scalability to be taken seriously Cryptocurrencies are...

Business4 days ago

Why Procurement is key in delivering your ESG strategy

By Edward Cox, Principal at Efficio Consulting   Environmental, social, and governance (ESG) has shifted from a niche to a...

Finance4 days ago

Skedadle to change the game for advertising with Currencycloud partnership

Currencycloud, the experts simplifying business in a multi-currency world, has partnered with Scottish start-up app Skedadle to provide its users...

Finance4 days ago

How financial services organisations can harness the power of low-code/no-code

By Joman Kwong, Strategic Solutions Manager, Financial, at Laserfiche   The UK’s erratic economy, and its spiralling cost-of-living crisis, have...

Finance4 days ago

SaaScada Top Five Predictions for 2023

From BNPL for business, to sustainability and financial inclusion, 2023 is going to be a year of change as the...

Business6 days ago

Hidden channel costs: how to find and tackle them

By Mark Wass, Strategic Sales Director, UK and North EMEA at CloudBlue     Growth for businesses will always be a...

Finance6 days ago

Is your business ready for finance automation?

Mari-Frances Bentvelzen, Business Head and General Manager of Global SMB at SAP Concur   As managers continue to drive their...

Top 106 days ago

The power of a proactive customer service

By Delia Pedersoli, COO, MultiPay   2023 is shaping up to be another challenging period for B2C businesses. While the...

Business6 days ago

Automation nation: Liberating workers from desks, data entry and the doldrums

Gert-Jan Wijman, VP of EMEA at Celigo.   Just when businesses thought the tough times were over, even more challenges...

News6 days ago

Protean and Fino Payments Bank tie-up to expand PAN card issuance services in India

Fino Payments Bank has tied up with Protean eGov Technologies (formerly NSDL e-Governance Infrastructure Limited), a market leader in universal,...

Business6 days ago

What is the True Cost of SMS Phishing?

Gemma Staite, Threat Analytics Lead   Cybercriminals will recycle attack strategies for as long as they are effective. In Fraud...

Technology7 days ago

Digital Asset Management (DAM) To Transform Enterprise Brand Management

Alexander Rich, Co-founder and CEO – Desygner    Rapid digital transformation fuelled by the pandemic has undoubtedly proven beneficial to...

Finance7 days ago

Cost of living: How to identify vulnerable customers

Ellie Engley is account director at REaD Group   In the current climate, the cost of living crisis is a...

Banking7 days ago

Is traditional business banking the best option for SME finance squeezes?

Airto Vienola, CEO, AREX Markets  The pressures facing business and personal finances alike have been well documented. Stories are now starting...

Business7 days ago

Breaking down communications silos to streamline the customer experience

Dave Tidwell, Head of Technical Pre-sales, DigitalWell   The pandemic has, without doubt, moved the goalposts when it comes to...

Business7 days ago

How growth can be a big challenge when a business becomes multiple entities

By Paul Sparkes, Commercial Director of award-winning accounting software developer, iplicit. Organisations don’t just grow in size – they also...

Trending