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2022 in review from LexisNexis Risk Solutions

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Jeffrey Skelton, MD for Europe, LexisNexis Risk Solutions, Insurance, UK and Ireland

 

Market moves as a force to start sharing insurance claims data

Rising claims costs[i], increases in application and claims fraud[ii], along with new pricing rules[iii], helped create another challenging year for the insurance industry.  Data enrichment has been the market’s ally in helping to tackle these challenges, speeding identity verification, flagging the signs of fraud, supporting fair and accurate pricing.  But still there was a gap, a big gap in claims intelligence. So by Summer 2022, moves were afoot to create a fundamental change to the way insurance providers rate, underwrite risk and manage claims, through the creation of a richer source of claims data, not just for one line of business but for home and motor claims to be viewed in combination for the first time.

This development will see new level of data enrichment using market wide claims data so that every part of the customer journey, not least the claim experience, widely acknowledged as the industry’s ‘shop window’ can be supported. And this approach only happens through market collaboration and market confidence in the power of contributory databases. In fact, the appetite has been so strong that insurance providers have moved as a force in 2022 to start sharing their claims data with over half the market now contributing – or committed to contributing.

In the same way contributory databases of policy history and NCD history were conceived, created and are now vital elements in the risk assessment process, historical claims data that has started to be shared by insurance providers will deliver a market wide view of home and motor claims for both the person and the asset. This means an insurance provider should be able to access the claims history for a home or a car before the customer owned it. It will also give them a much better understanding of the claims history for the household. This data has the power to not only support accurate quotes at the start of the insurance lifecycle but what’s truly exciting is its potential in helping to speed up First Notice of Loss (FNOL) and claims processes.

For FNOL, there is little doubt that the future lies in straight through ‘touchless’ processing for the majority of claims allowing claims professionals to focus on more complex cases. In essence, it means a better service for the claimant and better management of claims costs.

When the industry discusses what is best practice in the claims process, the consensus is that straight through processing will demand high quality data to feed decisioning rules. Using data in this way may reduce the amount of data collection by claims handlers and help them to reach conclusions far quicker. It is no surprise then that insurance providers are investing heavily in new platforms to enable greater efficiency and to deliver an enhanced claims experience. Data, including prior claims data, is going to provide the fuel to make this happen.

We are already seeing the market expanding the use of data enrichment to the claims function to improve the quality of data and direct the claims handlers’ time to focus on obtaining the more pertinent information needed directly from the customer to better help serve their needs.

We’ve also seen claims departments that are under increasing pressure to reduce expenses, identify and battle fraud, and enhance customer service—all while operating within a complex environment of multi-sourced information. So, ultimately it would make sense that further down the line, the evolution of claims would lie in a platform which embeds more timely, reliable insights into the claims management process, allowing insurance providers to reduce costs and resolve claims faster.

As we bid farewell to 2022 there’s no doubt that economic uncertainty will follow us into next year and fraud will undoubtedly remain a key concern. Leveraging insurance-specific data will continue to be paramount as the first line of defence. By exploiting an ever-expanding pool of data which can be used to hyper-personalise the insurance journey for individual policyholders, insurance providers will be given the power to develop a better understanding of their customers to support fair pricing, a policy appropriate for their needs and a swift resolution at claim.

 

[i] https://www.abi.org.uk/news/news-articles/2022/08/higher-costs-for-insurers-put-the-squeeze-on-the-price-of-motor-insurance/

https://www.zurich.co.uk/media-centre/cost-of-living-crisis-fuels-rise-in-insurance-fraud

[ii] https://insurancefraudbureau.org/media-centre/news/2022/dont-chance-fraud-ifb-launches-insurance-fraud-register-ifr-awareness-campaign/

[iii] https://www.abi.org.uk/products-and-issues/topics-and-issues/important-rule-changes-to-the-pricing-of-home-and-motor-insurance/

Business

2023 crypto trends that businesses need to know about

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By Marcus de Maria, Founder and Chairman of Investment Mastery

 

As cryptocurrencies have started to enjoy wider global acceptance in recent years, businesses and financial institutions have been slower to join the trend. Perhaps wisely, the business community has been more cautious in its approach to adopting cryptocurrencies than previously anticipated when Bitcoin first launched in 2009.

The tide is shifting though. The ever-changing digital marketplace has meant we’re now seeing increasingly more household name brands such as Microsoft, Google and Starbucks embracing payment in Bitcoin for some or all of its services or certainly trialling it. As 2022 draws to a close, over 15000 companies are excepting Bitcoin as payment around the world.

As more businesses take the plunge into the crypto world and off the back of one of the most volatile years in crypto history, what changes can we expect to see over the next year?

John Castro, CEO of Investment Mastery shares his 2023 cryptocurrency predictions below.

Marcus de Maria

Like the stock markets the crypto market is struggling against a backdrop of high inflation, the soaring cost of living, and a recessionary environment. As such prices have dropped a lot. However, sit up and take note for businesses who are looking into cryptocurrencies, 2023 could be looking promising for these three key reasons:

  1. The entering of institutions: What we are seeing now and what we will be seeing more of in 2023 are institutions entering the market. Pension funds are adding cryptos to their assets for the first time, news broke earlier this year that BlackRock is partnering with Coinbase to deliver crypto to their customers, and Fidelity and Citigroup are joining with their millions of clients. As the market inevitably becomes more regulated, we can expect this trend to continue which will encourage market growth.
  2. The formation of partnerships: As well as reputable institutions entering the market, 2023 will be bolstered by new partnerships between crypto and big business. We’re seeing Amazon partnering with either Ethereum and Solana among other cryptocurrencies and blockchains to host their cloud service. This has made the idea of crypto payment more attractive to global business leaders. As more businesses adopt cryptocurrency, we are likely to see a more stable crypto market in 2023.
  1. Bad players leaving the game: Like any market, crypto has had its share of bad players. In 2022 the market lost a lot of value thanks to the likes of Celsius ftx. This has inevitably shaken investors’ faith having a knock-on effect on price. But as these bad payers are knocked out, we predict that much needed trust will be rebuilt throughout the next year which will help lead to an increase in value.

With reputable institutions entering the market, powerful partnerships being made and the removal of those giving crypto a bad name, the prediction for 2023 is that demand for cryptocurrencies and blockchain technology is only going to increase. With supply staying the same thanks to the very nature of crypto, we can expect the price to inevitably increase.

So could a Bull market be upon us in 2023? Time will tell but one thing is for sure, cryptocurrencies are here to stay. It’s time for businesses to put their game faces on…

 

About Investment Mastery

Founded in 2003, Investment Mastery is a premium training and education company delivering easy to follow and profitable trading and investing strategies.

Today, Investment Mastery delivers training seminars and workshops, online and live in-person, annually. They have educated over thousands of people across 25 countries, while also developing and delivering industry-leading online support and training that is delivered in three different languages.

Led by founder and chairman Marcus de Maria and his expert team of real traders and investors in the fields of stocks, cryptocurrencies and forex, Investment Mastery’s training education is influenced by the exact same proven techniques that Marcus uses to trade and invest his own money.

The team at Investment Mastery do not just help clients to strengthen their finances, but their mindset too. This helps clients uncover, address and breakthrough their limiting beliefs behind wealth creation and find their reasons ‘why’. This unique approach is what sets them apart from other wealth creation educators and is why clients achieve such incredible results.

 

 

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The big cash squeeze: will fortune favour the bold?

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With a new political landscape, rising inflation, a cost-of-living crisis and increasing pressure from HMRC for payments, many businesses are preparing for a big cash squeeze in 2023. This could push demand for credit management services to a new high, so how will the industry fare and could fortune favour the bold?

At a recent roundtable event in Cardiff, chaired by the Chartered Institute of Credit Management (CICM) and hosted by accountancy firm, Menzies LLP, experts from across the industry discussed the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead for businesses.

During times of economic hardship, credit managers have a particularly challenging, frontline role to play in helping businesses to protect cash flow, while mitigating financial risks. However, a strong focus on cash management and credit control can also generate opportunities to increase revenues and boost profitability.

Challenges lie ahead, not least skills shortages

Prime Minister, Rishi Sunak, has warned that the UK is facing a ‘profound economic crisis’ and while this isn’t a surprise, many businesses feel ill-prepared. The fall-out from Brexit remains a major issue for many industries, particularly those trading in Europe, driving up costs and administration and leaving a legacy of staff shortages that is impacting productivity. High take-up of Government-backed loans during the COVID-19 pandemic, has left many businesses struggling to meet their repayments with reduced revenues and depleted cash reserves, all at a time of record inflation and a war in Ukraine, which is driving up energy costs to exorbitant levels that are simply not sustainable for some businesses.

According to delegates at the roundtable, the biggest and most immediate challenge that businesses are facing is the staffing crisis. Sue Chapple, chief executive of the CICM, commented: “Members are reporting significant staff shortages right across industry sectors. In particular, businesses note a lack of graduates and skilled young people – some of whom are choosing to delay the start of their careers. In sectors such as construction, food manufacturing and hospitality, reduced access to non-UK workers is a major problem.”

While sharing examples of best practice, Nicola Johnson, head of credit and cash processing at PHS, explained that credit management professionals need to invest more time encouraging workers to develop their skills and progress their careers. She said: “We have six workers about to start  CICM qualifications at the moment, supported by the business, and we hope that this will encourage them to stay and further their careers.” Other firms reported that more apprenticeships are being taken on to grow the skills base.

For recruiters serving the industry, the lack of candidates for jobs in areas such as credit assurance and risk data analysis is inflating wage expectations, which makes it even more challenging for businesses to recruit the people they need. Jason Pallister, managing director at DCS Credit Management & Recruitment, said: “Some businesses are being priced out of the market by larger companies that are able to offer more attractive reward and remuneration packages. Things are getting increasingly competitive and unrealistic wage expectations are a growing problem.”

Referring to staff shortages in other sectors, Craig Evans, head of new business sales at credit ratings provider, Company Watch, added: “Staff shortages are so serious in some industries that businesses are unable to trade and some are choosing to wind up now, rather than wait for the situation to get worse. This is a growing area of credit risk that our customers are seeking information about – particularly regarding the number of winding up petition applications.”

While there is no silver bullet to the staffing crisis, employers are aware that they need to remain flexible and understand what workers want. Hans Meijer, EICC director at Coface, said: “We are recruiting in London and Watford at the moment and the demographic of the candidates for vacancies at each location is quite different. Understanding this and staying flexible to individual worker preferences when it comes to hybrid working is helping us to attract the right people. Greater focus on training and skills development is also helping.”

Rising tide of insolvencies

With inflation rising and ongoing uncertainty surrounding trading conditions, the challenges facing businesses are expected to continue through 2023. The hike in energy costs, due next April, could be a pivotal moment for some businesses. A survey conducted recently by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) found that one in 10 UK businesses reported being at a ‘moderate-to-severe’ risk of insolvency, with rising energy costs cited as a major factor. Smaller firms with fewer than 50 employees were among those most likely to report being at risk.

Bethan Evans, business recovery partner at Menzies LLP, said: “Corporate insolvencies in England and Wales rose to a record level in Q2 and some businesses are seeking advice about entering an insolvency process now, because they know that cost and staffing pressures, as well as market uncertainty, are not going away. They are already on the brink and the rise in the energy price cap next April could push them over the edge.”

For in-house credit management teams, reading customer behaviour and spotting red flags is increasingly important. Some businesses are still working through customer issues caused by the pandemic restrictions. In some cases, contracts have been successfully re-negotiated or ‘Covid credits’ issued. However, in other instances, demands for payment and legal action for breach of contract have proved unavoidable. Overall, there is a willingness to be flexible but, with more customers favouring short-term contracts and seeking greater control over when and how they make their payments, credit managers are feeling the strain.

Sue Chapple commented: “It has never been more important for businesses to know their customers and understand the pressures and risks they are facing. Through effective communication, credit management professionals can help to build a more complete picture.”

More focus on supply-side risks

Customer risk isn’t the only source of financial risk requiring senior-level attention. Companies understand the importance of underwriting customer credit risk, but a growing number are now seeking advice about how to mitigate supply-side risks too. “Communication is vital, as businesses need to understand where external risks lie and how to identify them. They also need accurate data about where risks might arise in the future, so they are better informed,” commented Craig Evans.

Simon Philpin, head of trade credit at credit assurance provider, Markel, added: “We have seen increased demand for credit assurance linked to suppliers. Unfortunately, businesses in some sectors have been experiencing defaults or delays, which can be highly disruptive and financially damaging.

“Fraud is another major risk factor for businesses across industry sectors. Sometimes it is linked to the activities of financiers, such as invoice discounters, and we are advising businesses to be particularly cautious when auditing their suppliers and customers. Fraud linked to the misuse of Government-backed loans is also widespread.”

Fortune favours the agile

Despite the many challenges that businesses and their credit management teams are facing on a day-to-day basis, there will also be commercial opportunities in the year ahead. As some businesses demonstrated during the pandemic, those that are quick to diversify to meet new or growing areas of demand could reap rewards. According to Bethan Cooke, senior lawyer at Admiral Money: “While risk understanding is important, businesses should also be thinking about how they might expand products or service lines in the year ahead. In particular, digitisation can deliver better quality data about customer journeys to support cross-selling or other revenue-generating initiatives.”

Even in the midst of a ‘profound economic crisis’, some businesses will succeed in growing their market share or expanding into new markets. Craig Evans added: “In the 2008/09 recession, we worked with a construction business that took on more risk and increased its market share as a result. Now they are back and looking to do the same thing again. As long as they can quantify the risk they are taking on and don’t over-stretch, it could be another case of ‘fortune favours the bold’.”

 

This report is based on a roundtable event for employers and credit management professionals, chaired by the CICM and hosted by accountancy firm, Menzies LLP.

 

First published at Credit Management magazine.

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