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TRANSFORMATION IS NON-NEGOTIABLE FOR BANKS LOOKING TO DELIVER VALUE IN A POST-PANDEMIC WORLD

Andrew Warren, Head of Banking & Financial Services, UK&I, Cognizant

 

In addition to responding to changing customer expectations, higher operating costs, new technology, and an evolving regulatory landscape, financial services organisations now also face the uniquely challenging business environment created by COVID-19. The economic consequences that are unfolding rapidly and unpredictably mean that banks must double-down on both their efficiency and customer experience agendas. In light of this, the need to modernise legacy banking platforms will gain sharper focus as banks emerge into the post COVID-19 landscape, driven by the need to focus on value for customers and agility to change and shift operations quickly.

 If banks are to remain strong and stable and make real progress with their efficiency and experience agendas, transformation is non-negotiable – but it can be risky and have high rates of failure. So how can banks pursue their transformation agenda, while addressing the very real risk that modernisation of legacy banking platforms presents?

 

Communicating value across the business

 Banking transformation may have traditionally been the domain of the IT function, but the impact on current and future value means it should be on the agenda of a much wider set of senior executives. This includes the CIO and COO but should also be as far reaching as the Chief Risk Officer, Chief Financial Officer, Chief Digital Officer, and Chief Experience Officer.

When we talk about value in the context of transformation it can mean multiple things. In monetary terms, transformation can reduce the total cost of a bank’s IT infrastructure, with legacy equipment 55 per cent more costly than cloud data. More importantly however, transformation often results in moving from highly manual orientated processes to more efficient, automated – and therefore accurate – processes. In turn this can lead to more informed and tailored products and services, internal process efficiencies, enhanced cybersecurity, advanced analytics, and reduced risk, especially around fraud and malicious activity. These all add significant value to customers, as well as operational and regulatory imperatives.

Furthermore, viewing transformation through a value lens should tie it to a range of specific financial and accounting metrics that ultimately measure success. That includes both those that reflect the protection and extension of current value, as well as measuring the extent to which transformation will support the capture of future value. Financial services organisations have a huge opportunity to create greater value for customers from innovation in products and services. Changing market dynamics are creating a basis upon which banks and others in the industry can evolve their offerings and organisations.

In much the same way as we have already seen in retail, for example with Amazon and AliBaba, and media platforms, such as Facebook and Netflix, customers are adjusting to a new way of banking that is changing expectations. To keep up, banks need to increasingly provide easy-to-use digital-first services across their products, as well as introduce new tools to help customers manage their money in the 21st century. And there is no doubt that the fall-out from COVID-19 will likely further drive the degree and extent of digital adoption.

Traditionally, financial institutions take many different approaches to transformation, such as developing sleek new customer experiences to compete or developing new platforms and partnering with fintechs. But achieving success for more mature banks is more challenging given the obstacles presented by their legacy platforms. Comprising complex, customised systems, these are expensive to run and very costly to change.

 

The inevitability of change

To truly transform operations and experience, many banks are now having to face up to the reality that they cannot move forward without banking platform transformation. That means they must – in one way or another – replace their historic systems with more modern, cost-effective, and flexible platforms. That is going to be essential to stand up the capabilities required to enable digital products and deliver the truly revolutionary experiences that customers demand.

Recognising this, many banks are now considering their options. Some have already started down the challenging path and hit bumps in the road. A very small number have successfully executed their ambition to create a platform for the future. All banks contemplating transformation should take lessons from both the successes and the mistakes. These will be critical to inform their plans.

 

What are the next steps?

There are a number of essential transformation steps to consider that will help realise value from investment as rapidly as possible, provide an appropriate level of delivery confidence and manage exposure to the operational risk normally associated with such changes. These include:

1. Business strategy must inform every step of transformation – ensure that the approach to platform transformation is tightly aligned to the wider business strategy.

 

2. Design a strategy-aligned roadmap for delivery – a transformation roadmap should clearly set out the logical order in which business outcomes will be delivered. Here again, that needs to align with the value that the organisation is seeking to achieve, with incremental progress determined by business priorities. This involves making appropriate use of modern delivery methods, such as agile, and making sure that everything that is done satisfies and is frequently assessed against the relevant value criteria.

 

3. Assess technology selection against business value – organisations often undertake detailed and exhaustive market, functional and technical assessments when reviewing new products and suppliers. This often means either the technical assessment dominates proceedings and / or new technology platforms are selected without a clear line of sight to the value required. Poor product selection is a risk as a result, as well as a lack of understanding of how products should be deployed to inform the sequence of delivery required by the transformation roadmap.

 

4. Assess your readiness for change – unsurprisingly, given the sheer scale and velocity of change that business leaders must deal with, resistance to change is often a key reason given for the failure of banking transformation projects. However, it is crucial that the ability of the organisation to deliver and adopt the operational, technical, and cultural changes required to support transformation is comprehensively assessed and done early.

The impact of COVID-19 paired with and the demands that financial services organisations face from all directions, make change an inevitable necessity for the most. The approach to delivering a successful banking transformation, underpinned by a modernised platform, will vary dramatically from bank to bank. However, above all, businesses need to ensure that value drives every aspect of change explicitly linking transformation strategy and investment with the realisation of value.

 

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Banking

REDUCING FRICTION ONLINE HAS BECOME BUSINESS CRITICAL

Andrew Shikiar, Executive Director at the FIDO Alliance

 

The global pandemic has pushed the importance of remote access and authentication right up the agenda for many businesses. All those occasions where people would normally show up in person to open a bank account or pick-up some high street essentials were simply not possible for large parts of the year. Even as restrictions have eased across the country, these kinds of face-to-face transactions remain an unappealing prospect or a last-resort to many.

Not surprisingly, this has led to unprecedented demand for online and remote services. This brings with it a host of challenges and opportunities, and we have seen many examples of companies brilliantly adapting and reacting to this new way of life. But one issue that businesses and individuals have been grappling with for years – that of frictionless transactions and authentication – has now been put under a brighter spotlight as it is increasingly critical to get right.

 

Friction impacts the bottom line

The core challenge facing businesses is how to strike the right balance between giving customers the best possible experience of online service, and the necessary regulatory and security implications that directly affect – and often contradict – that ideal user experience.

We’ve all likely experienced the very real kinds of friction I’m talking about – it’s the account you gave up on registering for, or the purchase you abandoned because the process was just too frustrating.

Friction like this has direct bottom line impacts through the loss of sales and/or disaffected customers –  and it is substantially more pronounced in the current climate. People have less money to spend, they are spending a greater proportion of this reduced pot online, and businesses are competing for their livelihoods to claim their share. Providing a frictionless experience can be the difference between success and failure.

 

Banking and retail lose out

Nowhere is this problem more keenly felt than in the retail and banking industries. Countless transactions simply don’t happen each year due to issues with passwords or mobile One Time Passwords (OTPs) at the point of signing-up or checking-out.

Data from Statista shows that 69.57% of digital shopping carts and baskets are abandoned and the purchase not completed. And Mastercard’s analysis estimates that up to 20% of mobile e-commerce transactions are abandoned or otherwise fail (e.g., from undelivered SMS OTPs) mid-way.

In addition, independent web usability research institute Baynard found that one out of five consumers abandoned their online shopping carts citing the checkout process as “too long and complicated”. That means 20% of customers taking their custom elsewhere, likely to a competitor, because the process presented too much friction.

 

Passwords are a major part of the problem

Organisations have struggled to strike that balance between frictionless yet secure online log-ins in large part because of historical dependence on passwords – which simply aren’t fit for purpose in today’s online economy. Passwords were designed to be simple but, as we can all likely attest, they have become incredibly cumbersome and difficult to manage.

The demands placed on consumers to remember and keep track of the array of different passwords they need, and the different requirements of password complexity which varies from provider to provider, is proving to be untenable.

Not only are passwords a major cause of consumers giving up on purchases or preventing them from signing up for new services, but they also fail in delivering on their primary objective: to protect accounts and sensitive data. All too often the password has proven to be a single point of failure, and one that is all too easy for hackers and fraudsters to get hold of – a trend accelerated by the coronavirus pandemic.

 

Reducing friction

There has been a move toward developing and adopting open standards that enable any online service provider to authenticate users in a way that is both highly secure and almost completely frictionless – with all major platform and cloud service providers coalescing around a common approach.

It’s clear from the way consumers have embraced using their fingerprints and FaceID to unlock their devices that simple, natural gestures work – and that they are often preferred over using a password. By adopting the latest authentication standards, organisations can enable their customers to use these same easy gestures on their every-day devices to prove their identity and approve even the most sensitive of transactions.

The standards also improve security by moving away from the traditional model where your password or similar piece of ‘secret’ information is stored on a server, to one where credentials are stored on an individual’s device. This means they cannot be phished or divulged through other means of social engineering, while also inherently stopping the large-scale breaches that impact millions or billions of users in one go.

Due to these developments, the kind of poor user experience that leads to abandoned shopping carts and lost customers during the sign-up process is completely avoidable. There is now nothing stopping banks, retailers, and a range of other businesses from offering a superior, and low-friction user experience while also maintaining the safety and integrity of the networked economy.

 

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Banking

BANKING ON THE FUTURE: WHY PAYMENTS TRANSFORMATION IS THE KEY TO SUCCESS

Simon Wilson, Co-Head, Payments at Icon Solutions

 

Standardisation, regulation and technological innovation means payments are well on the way to becoming instant, invisible and free. This is good news for everybody.

Well, not quite everybody. Banks are now faced with the significant challenge of transforming business models and legacy technology systems to meet the demands of a new era in payments.

Banking is historically a conservative and risk-averse industry where the pace of change varies between sedate and glacial. But now is not the time to ‘wait and see’ and finding the right approach to payments transformation must be the immediate and fundamental priority for banks.

 

Understanding the need to transform

Firstly, we must ask: Why has payments transformation become an urgent priority?

For one thing, increased competition has seen banks’ market share of the global banking and payments industry reduce from 96% in 2010 to 72% today. Fintechs, challengers, payments companies and big tech have entered the playground and started taking banks’ lunch money, demonstrating a level of innovation and agility that incumbent banks are struggling to keep up with.

And of course, there is Covid-19. We have seen years, if not decades, of change in a matter of months. The crisis has torpedoed traditional and reliable revenue streams such as cross-border payments to accelerate margin pressure, while driving a rapid shift to online banking channels and a massive uplift in digital volumes.

 

Simon Wilson

Breaking the shackles

In the context of increased competition and unprecedented digitalisation, the banking industry is waking up to the fact that payments are about adding value, not just processing. There is increasing recognition that capitalising on the potential of emerging payment rails, monetising the standardised datasets unlocked by ISO 20022 and launching new external services are huge opportunities to diversify and retain relevance. The introduction of overlay services such as Request to Pay or the European Payments Initiative are also poised to spur on the move to digital payments.

Decades of inaction on legacy infrastructure, however, is limiting options. Banks across the globe find themselves lumbered with expensive, inflexible and unreliable technology estates. The ability to respond to marketplace innovation, let alone lead it, is constrained by the need to devote massive amounts of cash, time and ever-dwindling internal resource to simply keep the lights on.

It is apparent that doing nothing is no longer an option, but transformation is a nebulous concept. There is no one single way to effectively transform. Different organisations have unique considerations based on their technology, capabilities, resource and culture, and there are various routes to take.

 

‘Don’t outsource your heart, your soul…and your spinal cord’

One option is to make payments someone else’s problem and outsource them. This can be an appealing proposition to get a seemingly perennial cost centre off the books, particularly in the current climate. But speaking at Sibos, J.P. Morgan CEO Jamie Dimon cautioned against the risk of inadvertently “outsourcing your heart, your soul and your spinal cord.”

For it is true that payments are the beating heart and soul of an organisation. Payments represent 80% of all interactions, providing critical customer touchpoints, data and service opportunities. As for the spinal cord, not much can happen when mission-critical payment systems go down.

The big problem, as Dimon notes, is that a lot of companies who have outsourced “have no idea what they are doing.”

Banks can find themselves stuck with equally costly, complex and cumbersome alternatives, falling even further behind the innovation curve and losing control in the process. “You end up paying too much money and then you’re beholden to costs that are going up.” But most importantly, “you’re not even doing a better job serving your client.”  Outsourcing a commodity execution service may well be the right strategic approach for some, but you need to ensure you have the other pieces of the payment process running smoothly and that you really are not leaving money on the table or  developing risk longer term by constraining future choice.

Still, the alternative is not necessarily better. Modernisation needs to happen now, so it is not surprising that enthusiasm for years-long, ruinously expensive and inherently risky in-house transformation projects has dimmed somewhat.

 

Best of both worlds

Yet it is wrong to say that the only choice is buy or build. There is a middle-ground. A collaborative approach to payments transformation that allows banks to move quickly to seize opportunities, while retaining control, significantly reducing costs and adding value.

This begins with banks understanding their starting point, defining a crystal-clear strategic vision for the role that payments play within the organisation and identifying market opportunities. Indeed, as McKinsey notes, “success for banks will depend on thoughtfully assessing capabilities [and] determining the role of payments in market strategies.”

Banks should then consider low-risk and lightweight options for upgrading legacy infrastructure to meet their strategic objectives, while minimising business impact. Payment platforms based on Cloud-native, open source technology promote flexibility, scalability and independence, rather than restrictive and expensive vendor dependencies.

Collaboration also plays a critical role. Finding the right fintech and service provider partners can allow banks to simplify complexity, reduce manual heavy-lifting and lower their cost base, driving efficiencies that enable resource to be focused on delivering for customers. As Dimon explains, “If I can’t build it better than you can, I’m better off just using yours.”

This combination of strategy, enabling technologies and true collaboration provides a foundation for innovation. It can help drive new revenues, further develop existing business lines and, by moving payments from cost to profit centre, help banks thrive rather than survive.

 

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