Connect with us

Interviews

LEI 101 – HOW IT WORKS AND WHY IT ENABLES SMARTER, LESS COSTLY AND MORE RELIABLE DECISIONS ABOUT WHO TO DO BUSINESS WITH

A Q&A with GLEIF’s CEO Stephan Wolf.

 

Who is GLEIF and what is a LEI?

The Financial Stability Board (FSB) established the Global Legal Entity Identifier Foundation (GLEIF) to support the implementation and use of the Legal Entity Identifier (LEI).

 

In the past, accurately identifying legal entities on a global level has been a complex task, requiring a significant investment in time, money and resources. This was because there wasn’t a single, open and up-to-date database giving you all the information you needed.

This lack of transparency ultimately led to financial crises, fraud and market abuse.

 

LEIs trace their origins to the 2008 financial crisis, when regulators and capital market players needed to quickly assess the extent of market participants exposed to Lehman Brothers and each of its hundreds of subsidiaries. This laid bare the critical need for a system to identify and understand exposures at the legal entity level instead of the aggregate, parent-company level. If it had been available at the time, a system that assigns an electronic, standard entity identifier to legally distinct parties would have helped to fill this gap.

 

In order to remedy this, the FSB, together with the finance ministers and central bank governors represented in the G20, advocated developing a universal LEI for any legal entity involved in financial transactions.

 

The LEI is a 20-digit, alpha-numeric code based on the ISO 17442 standard developed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). Each LEI connects to key reference information describing a legal entity including its ownership structure. LEIs enable smarter, less costly and more reliable decisions about who to do business with, while bringing simplicity to onboarding and transacting.

 

This is why GLEIF exists. We make available the Global LEI Index, which is the only global online source that provides open, standardized and high-quality legal entity reference data.

 

Why are LEIs important?

Current identification processes have significant manual components and often require the use of multiple databases in which a counterparty may be identified by a different name. Many banks and corporations still use names rather than identifiers, resulting in confusion. As an example, a large bank’s client services division recently found that it had an average of five names—with minor variations in its database—for the same organization. Additionally, commonly used databases, different divisions and IT systems within organizations can all have varying versions of the same entity’s name, making it harder to trace and to link information from multiple sources.

 

How do LEIs work?

It’s a simple process. A company that wishes to obtain an LEI chooses its preferred business partner from the list of GLEIF-accredited LEI issuing organizations. Through self-registration, a legal entity that then supplies accurate reference data. This reference information is validated against third party sources, before it’s hosted online for all to use.

By replacing siloed information with a standardized approach, LEIs take the complexity out of business transactions.

Since being introduced, LEIs have allowed public authorities to better evaluate risks, make corrective steps and improve data integrity. And they’re giving businesses the confidence they need to engage in transactions with total visibility, greater certainty and improved control.

 

How do LEIs fix business problems?

In our report – A New Future for Legal Entity Identification – we looked into the challenges of entity identification in financial services. We found that one of the biggest issues lay in onboarding new businesses, with streamlined onboarding far from a reality within the sector. In fact, over half (57%) of salespeople in banks said they spend 27% of their working week (or more than 1.5 days per week) onboarding new client organizations. With half (50%) of financial institutions using, on average, four identifiers to help identify client organizations during the onboarding process, inefficiencies are plaguing the process for many businesses.

 

This has significant consequences; 39% of respondents reported that there is a risk of losing business due to the length and complexity of the process. In fact, the respondents in our study believed that 15% of business is at risk as a result of the client losing patience with the process and 14% is lost because the client’s identity cannot be verified.

 

The stats further highlight how adopting LEIs for each client organization can provide slicker onboarding which leads to improved consistency, less risk of business loss and more efficient use of valuable resources. We’ve found that introducing LEIs into capital market onboarding and securities trade processing could reduce annual trade processing and onboarding costs by 10%. This would lead to a 3.5% reduction in overall capital markets operations costs (or U.S.$150 million in annual savings) for the global investment banking industry alone.

 

Why all businesses should have a LEI

There are millions of business entities on our planet, and it’s increasingly important that we can identify who is who and what is what. The LEI allows everyone to cut costs, accelerate operations and gain deeper insight into the global marketplace.

This means businesses won’t lose time and money due to an inefficient process. They can make smarter, less costly and more reliable decisions about who to do business with, because the LEI becomes the common link that pieces all records associated with an organization together. This provides certainty of identity in all online interactions, and makes it easier for everyone to participate in the global digital marketplace.

 

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Interviews

HOW NEW TECH START-UP IS SHAKING UP THE IT CONTRACT MARKET

Neil How, CEO and Co-founder, ten80

 

1. What is ten80?

ten80 enables cost savings on SAP/software projects by an average of 43%. We do this by switching companies to an on-demand workforce – think Uber and how that has disrupted the taxi industry.

The ten80 marketplace connects companies with around 47,000 verified contractors, using algorithms to match companies with the very best experts that then deliver on projects remotely. This enables SAP customers to utilise a global workforce and break free from geographical borders, as well as take advantage of international market rates. In other words, it gives them the exact resources, when they want them, for however long they need them for and at a cost-effective price.

 

2. How did the idea of ten80 come about?

I’ve been lucky enough to work with SAP my entire career. My journey first started at the end-user side. I ran my first SAP implementation project in my early twenties and went on to form an SAP Centre of Excellence to allow for long term improvement.

Over the next six years, I ran three other major change programmes before joining the consulting world, and for the next 10 years I worked with various consultancies running numerous projects in a wide variety of sectors, including retail, utilities, banking public sector and government.

But having spent time working both end-user side and consulting side, it became clear that SAP clients were struggling to access the best in class consultants and contractors. Wanting to get this knowledge into the wider world, ten80 was formed to digitally link the global contracting workforce to a global customer base, while allowing clients to digitally access the ‘best in world’ not the ‘best in organisation’.

 

3. ten80 is solving business problems, but how is it helping contractors?

Consistency of regular work is becoming a challenge for many contractors, and the impact of ‘dead time’ becoming more severe and likely. This is made worse through an ever increasing pool of expert contractors.

In addition, selling time for money is not a sustainable model for financial freedom, and contractors are tired of being capped at an ever decreasing day rate. Contracting also puts a huge pressure on family life, especially if you have to be on-site away from home — missing out on time with family and loved ones is a huge drawback, and there is little work life balance.

With ten80, contractors can benefit from the following:

  • An ‘always on’ demand for work
  • The ability to sell their knowledge and capabilities rather than a day of their time
  • Being able to carry out their role wherever in the world at any time, with total bulletproof security

 

4. What are the main challenges for your business?

ten80 is operating in a completely new area — outcomes-based delivery, so not being able to be ‘put’ us in a specific vendor box type is a challenge. Often corporate organisation’s procurement processes want to categorise us as a systems integrator or recruiter, but we are neither.

Being the first to market is always hard. We are offering some really powerful benefits to businesses and contractors, but we have no one to follow and are learning at every step of the way. There is a great saying that I have always believed in – “Success leaves footprints.” The big difference with ten80 is that we are making them! We are running agile processes on each stage of our journey. Everything is tested, iterated, refined, repeated. It’s the curse of being the first, but actually embedding continual improvement into our business has been one of our rocks of success.

Another challenge has also been controlling deal size. Big corporates have latched onto the benefits of what we are offering and are immediately referring us globally. It’s great but can quickly escalate and then take longer to close.

 

5. What’s next for ten80?

Our focus/goal is to secure a major investment over the next six months. That’s the first ticket to the major league and will give us the potential to grow to 150 people and some pretty big numbers revenue wise. We are entertaining some pretty important investment houses and are looking forward to one of them closing.

Running alongside that we have some really amazing companies in our pipeline, and I am looking forward to welcoming them onto our platform.

 

Continue Reading

Interviews

GOING FOR INVESTMENT IN CENTRAL EUROPE: START-UP LIFE OUTSIDE A TRADITIONAL TECH HUB

A Q&A with Bence Jendruszak, Co-founder and COO at SEON

 

  1. At what stage did you realise you were going to need an investor onboard?

During the early stages of the development (when completing our minimum viable product), we managed secure a Central European payment gateway in order to start using our system (free of charge). From this point on our product development was user feedback driven. It was at this stage, that we realised that our product has gained enough proof of concept, that we were ready to pitch the idea to investors.

 

  1. How important was the investment to getting your business to the current point?

Our pre-seed investment (50k EUR in January of 2017) was the initial kick-start to arriving to the current point. That micro-investment allowed myself and Tamas (Co-founder and CEO or SEON) to start working on the project full time and also to scale up the development team (from freelancers to full time programmers).

 

  1. How did you start the process of looking for an investor? 

We started by setting up our very first pitch deck. Of course, a lot of market analysis and USP shaping went into this. Once we had our first deck, we started contacting investors and started pitching the project to them. That specific pitch deck was very different to what the current version looks like.

 

  1. Were you aware of the challenges you could potentially face as a tech start-up in CE?

We were very well aware of the challenges. The European investment mentality is different than that of the US investment mentality, for example. Investors tend to be more conservative in the EU. Now imagine what the investment mentality may be like in the CE region. Nevertheless, we were also aware of the advantages of setting up a tech start-up in the CE region. The talent pool of

engineers and the cost of labour is by far the best in our home-turf – so the challenge was worthwhile.

 

  1. What was your journey to finding an investor like? Challenges / milestones?

Initially, we were faced with multiple unacceptable deals. The terms and conditions weren’t right for us in the long term. We were always aware that in order to build an international start-up (that would later develop into a scale-up), we had to on-board investors that we were fully comfortable to cooperate with – and vice versa. We needed to be on the same page and have a shared vision for SEON’s future.

 

  1. How did you find your lead investor, Portfolion? What else do they offer in addition to financial investment? (international network etc.)

We met them by introduction from an acquaintance. Portfolion is a well renowned VC in the CE region. They seemed like a partner that we could on-board into our boat and we could steer the ship together with them. They are the subsidiary of OTP Bank, one of the largest banks in the CE region. A potential gateway to partnering with a major bank seemed like a mutually beneficial setup. Aside from receiving a financial investment from the fintech fund of Portfolion, we can happily say that we are providing our fraud prevention services to OTP Bank as of today.

 

  1. What have you learned about the investor landscape in CE?

We found out that European investors are even more sceptical when it comes to CEE countries. They tend to avoid start-ups that aren’t located in hubs like Berlin or London. For them, Hungary is still seen as a former Eastern bloc country playing catch up with the rest of Europe in terms of living standards and infrastructure.

That said, there are a lot of investors in the region, but you really have to focus on getting in touch with the right organization. Onboarding an investor is a long-term partnership, there has to be a fundamental alignment in terms of the vision and mission of the two teams. We believe that we’ve managed to partner with investors who share the same vision and mission as us (up to date).

 

  1. What role will investment play in the next growth stage of the SEON?

 The next growth stage is focused on international expansion. We will be seeking an investor that can provide not only funds, but also somebody that has a solid portfolio of fintech companies and a partner network of financial institutions.

 

  1. Do you have any advice for other businesses in your position that are looking for funding in the CE region?

Do not rush into any deal that is in front of you, time is on your side. If you are in an early stage, make sure to approach as many investors as possible, in order to be able benchmark each opportunity.

 

Continue Reading

Magazine

Partner Events

Trending

Wealth Management1 day ago

DON’T RISK IT ALL WITH NON-COMPLIANCE

By Paul Sleath, CEO at PEO Worldwide   Did you know non-compliance costs more than twice the cost of maintaining or...

News2 days ago

BANKIA TRANSFORMS THE CUSTOMER AND EMPLOYEE EXPERIENCE WITH BIANKA BY IPSOFT

Developed with cognitive artificial intelligence, IPsoft’s conversational agent can carry out transactional tasks, perform different roles in customer service and...

Finance2 days ago

FIDUCIARY MANAGEMENT

by Devan Nathwani, FIA and Investment Strategist at Secor Asset Management   Defined Benefit pension schemes are one of the most significant institutional...

Business2 days ago

TOUCH-FREE AUTHENTICATION FOR ALL: WHY WE NEED A SAFER PAYMENT METHOD IN THE ‘NEW NORMAL’

David Orme, SVP, Sales & Marketing, IDEX Biometrics ASA   Ever since March, when the World Health Organization encouraged people to...

Banking2 days ago

WHY BANKS NEED TO EMBRACE OPEN SOURCE COMMUNITIES

Nikolai Stankau, Director Business Development, EMEA Financial Services at Red Hat, the world’s largest enterprise open source solutions provider.  ...

FINANCIAL MARKET FINANCIAL MARKET
Wealth Management2 days ago

FOR PE TO SNAP UP “GOOD” COMPANIES, THEY MAY NEED TO WADE INTO “BAD” ECONOMIES

By  Martin Soderberg, Partner at SPEAR Capital   There’s no shortage of global challenges for investors currently, especially for those...

Business3 days ago

THE BASICS OF BUSINESS FINANCE

When you’re starting your business, you’ve got a lot to be thinking about. You need to find affordable suppliers, market...

Business3 days ago

HOW THE IMPORTANCE OF E-COMMERCE PLATFORMS GREW DURING THE PANDEMIC

Never in history has the world relied more on the internet than during this Covid-19 pandemic. With governments imposing lockdowns...

Business3 days ago

UNBANKED AND UNCONNECTED: SUPPORTING FINANCIAL INCLUSION BEYOND DIGITAL

Darren Capehorn, Director, Icon Solutions   Many of us take it for granted, but accessing basic financial services is fundamental...

Banking5 days ago

MORE THAN REGULATION – HOW PSD2 WILL BE A KEY DRIVING FORCE FOR AN OPEN BANKING FUTURE

Ralf Ohlhausen, Executive Advisor, at PPRO   Whilst initially seen as simply a regulation exercise, the second Payment Service Directive,...

Top 105 days ago

TIME TO THINK OUTSIDE OF THE BLACK BOX

Mike Brockman, CEO, ThingCo   If you have the unbridled joy of parenting a teenager you’ll probably know what telematics...

Banking5 days ago

BANKING’S SECOND WAVE OF TRANSFORMATION: INTEGRATING THE CLOUD-ENABLED FUTURE BANK

Keith Pearson, Head of Financial Services EMEA, ServiceNow   The last six months have seen significant changes to the financial services landscape, with operational resilience, economic recovery, cost reduction and an...

News5 days ago

RISK AND INVESTMENT SPECIALIST, CARDANO, TAKES TO DOCUMENT AND EMAIL MANAGEMENT IN THE CLOUD WITH ASCERTUS AS IMPLEMENTATION PARTNER

Ascertus also providing document comparison tool, compareDocs    Cardano, a privately-owned, purpose-built risk and investment specialist, has chosen Ascertus Limited as its implementation...

Wealth Management1 week ago

HOW SALARY SLIPS HELP YOU UNDERSTAND TAX DEDUCTIONS ON YOUR SALARY

A salary slip is defined as a document that is provided by your employer which contains the breakdown of your...

Banking1 week ago

BRANCHES ARE THE HUMAN FACE OF YOUR BANK?

Sudeepto Mukherjee, Senior Vice President, Financial Services Lead EMEA & APAC Publicis Sapient   Branches have always played a pivotal...

News1 week ago

RISE IN E-COMMERCE FOR SMALL BUSINESSES IS A BIGGER RISK THAN JUST STOCK CONTROL

With consumer confidence in the high street at an all-time low, many SME shops and businesses have moved to online...

Finance1 week ago

TIME TO FOCUS ON YOUR ‘WEALTHBEING’

Tony Mudd, Divisional Director, Development & Technical Consultancy. St James’s Place   FIVE WAYS TO SAFEGUARD YOUR FINANCIAL FUTURE The...

COVID-19 COVID-19
Finance1 week ago

PAYROLL AGILITY IN THE CORONAVIRUS CRISIS – HOW FINANCE FIRMS CAN ACHIEVE IT

by Hannah Grimshaw, BPO Payroll Lead, Symatrix   The government has published guidance with regards to the next steps for...

Business1 week ago

WHY IT’S TIME TO ADAPT TO THE VIRTUAL WORLD: HOW TO MASTER ONLINE NEGOTIATIONS

By Tony Hughes, CEO at Huthwaite International, a leading global provider of sales, negotiation and communication skills development   Virtual...

News1 week ago

BNP PARIBAS PERSONAL FINANCE COLLABORATES WITH EXPERIAN AND ARYZA TO HELP CUSTOMERS THROUGH THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC

The consumer finance specialist will be using the Open Banking tool to help customers create an affordable payment plan based...

Trending