Connect with us

Banking

HOW BANKS CAN RESPOND TO NEW CHALLENGES AND PLAN FOR RESILIENCE

James Gannaway, Head of Financial Services & Insurance, Board International

 

The Bank of England (BoE) is postponing its climate stress tests, which have been previously well regarded as a ground-breaking initiative to enable in-depth analysis of the impact of global warming on business models and operations of both banks and insurers.

 

Climate change

The bank’s Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA) and the Financial Policy committee in a statement on priorities in light of the impact of the current global lockdown, has said it will delay the launch of its climate biennial exploratory scenario, which will test the resiliency of the largest financial firms’ business models to the physical and transition risks from climate change, until at least mid-2021.

Central banks worldwide have been increasingly involved in the debate over climate change and the impact on the financial system. The BoE has led the way to date in encouraging banks and insurers, to assess exposures to global warming and new risks which can come with the move towards a low-carbon economy.

So what does this mean for Banks who would have been making boardroom level plans for the impending stress tests?

Firstly, a short postponement of the Bank’s stress tests, is completely understandable, given the realignment of central banks all over the world to refocus financial policies, and double-down on help to try to manage the economic fall out of the current lockdown.

But – secondly, and just as importantly, the climate emergency is not going away, and will return to the top of the BoE’s agenda very soon, meaning vital plans at Banks & Insurers, must continue to be made.

 

New normal

Right now there are many commentators talking about a new normal, McKinsey go one step further frequently referring to a next normal. The climate emergency and the transition to the low carbon economy will feature heavily in boardroom plans as banks plan for what this next normal will look like. Banks can’t afford to detract from planning for the key operational priorities now, as the importance of climate risk to banks and their clients will only continue to grow.

The impact of climate risk and the successful transition to a low carbon economy will be THE next normal for the way in which the global finance industry must be rewired to operate. BoE stress tests will be implemented – and this is going to mean people, processes and technology need to be recalibrated to ensure banks are resilient and can meet new key performance indicators.

The global transition to a low carbon economy, means getting ahead of and planning for a moment in time, which will be crucial to how banks and insurers operate successfully in the future. The ability to plan for today’s challenges – and have one eye on what is coming down the road, means board level leadership teams at Banks needs to be all over the key data and metrics which will define future success.

The ability to pivot operations, plans, forecasts and teams in response to new stress test metrics will dictate the finance industry leaders who will thrive in the future and demonstrate real leadership.

 

Digital Boardrooms

A move to Digital Boardrooms will drive this new operational mindset. CXO leaders at forward-thinking banks will want the latest data driven metrics in front of them in real time, so they can see and report back on how their Bank is progressing on the road to a transitioning and complying with new low carbon economy KPIs.

Executive leaders across the financial services industry will expect to be able to respond to the changing business agenda, by accelerating their most important decision-making through genuine digital transformation.

Take, for example, a board meeting where a bank’s business strategy is being discussed and which direction the bank should take to respond to new legislation relating to the new low carbon economy. With multiple routes available, how should a decision be made? A digital boardroom will provide the answer.

Such a decision-making platform allows anyone in the room to perform complex scenario modelling and build strategic plans as they go and discuss potential outcomes with data. A bank or insurer considering the development of a new way of working to comply with new stress tests focused on their resilience, needs to answer a number of questions before moving forward – what and where are the resources needed to step-up? Will the new transition require investment in people? Would it be more economical to hire additional staff, upskill existing employees or outsource certain aspects completely? What is the impact from other potential shifts in the economy in future?

Today’s turbulent environment means executive leaders at finance organisations must be able to plan, adapt and react with speed. Data silos across the organisation must be broken down, to gain a holistic view of banks’ performance in line with the BoE’s new stress tests. Connecting banks’ operational planning activities, joining-up functional transparency, and enabling the accurate simulation and testing of scenarios in Digital Boardrooms has never been greater in order to comply with the new stress tests that we know will arrive in the near future soon.

Banking

TRANSFORMATION IS NON-NEGOTIABLE FOR BANKS LOOKING TO DELIVER VALUE IN A POST-PANDEMIC WORLD

Andrew Warren, Head of Banking & Financial Services, UK&I, Cognizant

 

In addition to responding to changing customer expectations, higher operating costs, new technology, and an evolving regulatory landscape, financial services organisations now also face the uniquely challenging business environment created by COVID-19. The economic consequences that are unfolding rapidly and unpredictably mean that banks must double-down on both their efficiency and customer experience agendas. In light of this, the need to modernise legacy banking platforms will gain sharper focus as banks emerge into the post COVID-19 landscape, driven by the need to focus on value for customers and agility to change and shift operations quickly.

 If banks are to remain strong and stable and make real progress with their efficiency and experience agendas, transformation is non-negotiable – but it can be risky and have high rates of failure. So how can banks pursue their transformation agenda, while addressing the very real risk that modernisation of legacy banking platforms presents?

 

Communicating value across the business

 Banking transformation may have traditionally been the domain of the IT function, but the impact on current and future value means it should be on the agenda of a much wider set of senior executives. This includes the CIO and COO but should also be as far reaching as the Chief Risk Officer, Chief Financial Officer, Chief Digital Officer, and Chief Experience Officer.

When we talk about value in the context of transformation it can mean multiple things. In monetary terms, transformation can reduce the total cost of a bank’s IT infrastructure, with legacy equipment 55 per cent more costly than cloud data. More importantly however, transformation often results in moving from highly manual orientated processes to more efficient, automated – and therefore accurate – processes. In turn this can lead to more informed and tailored products and services, internal process efficiencies, enhanced cybersecurity, advanced analytics, and reduced risk, especially around fraud and malicious activity. These all add significant value to customers, as well as operational and regulatory imperatives.

Furthermore, viewing transformation through a value lens should tie it to a range of specific financial and accounting metrics that ultimately measure success. That includes both those that reflect the protection and extension of current value, as well as measuring the extent to which transformation will support the capture of future value. Financial services organisations have a huge opportunity to create greater value for customers from innovation in products and services. Changing market dynamics are creating a basis upon which banks and others in the industry can evolve their offerings and organisations.

In much the same way as we have already seen in retail, for example with Amazon and AliBaba, and media platforms, such as Facebook and Netflix, customers are adjusting to a new way of banking that is changing expectations. To keep up, banks need to increasingly provide easy-to-use digital-first services across their products, as well as introduce new tools to help customers manage their money in the 21st century. And there is no doubt that the fall-out from COVID-19 will likely further drive the degree and extent of digital adoption.

Traditionally, financial institutions take many different approaches to transformation, such as developing sleek new customer experiences to compete or developing new platforms and partnering with fintechs. But achieving success for more mature banks is more challenging given the obstacles presented by their legacy platforms. Comprising complex, customised systems, these are expensive to run and very costly to change.

 

The inevitability of change

To truly transform operations and experience, many banks are now having to face up to the reality that they cannot move forward without banking platform transformation. That means they must – in one way or another – replace their historic systems with more modern, cost-effective, and flexible platforms. That is going to be essential to stand up the capabilities required to enable digital products and deliver the truly revolutionary experiences that customers demand.

Recognising this, many banks are now considering their options. Some have already started down the challenging path and hit bumps in the road. A very small number have successfully executed their ambition to create a platform for the future. All banks contemplating transformation should take lessons from both the successes and the mistakes. These will be critical to inform their plans.

 

What are the next steps?

There are a number of essential transformation steps to consider that will help realise value from investment as rapidly as possible, provide an appropriate level of delivery confidence and manage exposure to the operational risk normally associated with such changes. These include:

1. Business strategy must inform every step of transformation – ensure that the approach to platform transformation is tightly aligned to the wider business strategy.

 

2. Design a strategy-aligned roadmap for delivery – a transformation roadmap should clearly set out the logical order in which business outcomes will be delivered. Here again, that needs to align with the value that the organisation is seeking to achieve, with incremental progress determined by business priorities. This involves making appropriate use of modern delivery methods, such as agile, and making sure that everything that is done satisfies and is frequently assessed against the relevant value criteria.

 

3. Assess technology selection against business value – organisations often undertake detailed and exhaustive market, functional and technical assessments when reviewing new products and suppliers. This often means either the technical assessment dominates proceedings and / or new technology platforms are selected without a clear line of sight to the value required. Poor product selection is a risk as a result, as well as a lack of understanding of how products should be deployed to inform the sequence of delivery required by the transformation roadmap.

 

4. Assess your readiness for change – unsurprisingly, given the sheer scale and velocity of change that business leaders must deal with, resistance to change is often a key reason given for the failure of banking transformation projects. However, it is crucial that the ability of the organisation to deliver and adopt the operational, technical, and cultural changes required to support transformation is comprehensively assessed and done early.

The impact of COVID-19 paired with and the demands that financial services organisations face from all directions, make change an inevitable necessity for the most. The approach to delivering a successful banking transformation, underpinned by a modernised platform, will vary dramatically from bank to bank. However, above all, businesses need to ensure that value drives every aspect of change explicitly linking transformation strategy and investment with the realisation of value.

 

Continue Reading

Banking

CLOUD ALLOWS BANKS TO BASK IN CHANGE

by: Elliott Limb, Chief Customer Officer at Mambu

 

As a new era of banking takes off, the cloud is enabling players to adapt fast at low cost and with minimum risk, while rolling out products that customers actually want, writes Elliott Limb

For all the talk of today’s banking landscape being the most competitive ever, you’d think the customer would be spoilt for choice. Sure, there are more banks and prices are low, but the reality is that it is still pretty hard to tell one from another when it comes to real value-added services.

Every retail bank, for example, offers some form of online and mobile banking; and most private banks have adopted automation and robo advice of some kind to help bring costs down and make its service more relevant to customers.

The upshot of this homogeneity is that rather than working to provide a unique service, banks seek to stand out from the pack through marketing – offering free travel insurance for premium customers; zero-fee balance transfers; no interest on overdrafts; low-cost or flexible loans. These offers aren’t about providing a better banking service. They are small treats in an industry that has raced to the bottom on price.

But this old-school approach is now being challenged. Technology across other industries has already forced change, putting choice for the customer front and centre. The big platform companies like Amazon or Google were among the first to use Big Data and algorithms to analyse behaviour and thus predict what the customer wants – often before the customer knows it themselves.

As other industries apply predictive technologies, it has had two effects: customers have come to expect a highly personalised and relevant service that enhances their lives; and the big platform companies are beginning to encroach on some banking activities such as loans and payments. The capital reserves held by Apple today would put it among the top ten banks outside China.

Taken together, these changes are dragging banking into a new era of differentiation and choice, where customers will expect to get what they want when they want it at a price they’re willing to pay.

What every successful player will have in common is agility – the ability to quickly adapt and change not just products and services but business strategy to reflect movements within its own market space. And to be clear: this agility isn’t just about the technology that is used – it’s a business model.

The agile model doesn’t wed the bank to a set of tools; it marries the bank to choice, thereby maximising the chances of it becoming and remaining the best. This agility can only come from cloud operations.

 

Enter the cloud

Cloud allows banks to innovate fast. Digital technology in the cloud lets them quickly reconfigure products and services to take into account new regulations or temporary circumstances – the fall-out of Covid-19 and the need to waive overdraft fees or provide payment holidays, for example. Where legacy systems demand banks carefully plan and time changes, which can take many months, banks working with the cloud can carry them out on the hoof, often within hours. This makes them more competitive, incurs lower costs and lowers risk.

Working with the cloud also allows banks to align costs to revenues because billing is on a pay-as-you-use basis. Use can be scaled up or down according to demand, so expensive technology doesn’t lie idle on-premise ever. Locked-in costs are minimised. This means that you could launch a great new customer-centric bank today and scale up to become a $1bn unicorn fast.

Finally, cloud technology helps cut risk. By providing flexibility, banks can adapt their products and services as the market evolves. They aren’t locked into medium and long-term strategies. They can be nimble.

Furthermore, cloud providers invest heavily in their technology, updating and upgrading it constantly and ensuring its resilience and security in a way that individual banks simply couldn’t afford. So banks working with cloud providers will have access to the best, most secure, resilient, up-to-date technology.

Make no mistake. Competition going forward will be tough and customers will expect the best or they will go elsewhere. Margins are already low, thanks to the above mentioned fight to the bottom on price.

However, banks using cloud technology will be ready to compete on a level unseen as yet and offer customers services that they want and need, at price points they can afford. They are able to differentiate on agility and adapt quickly as their market dictates and they are able to manage risk. As a result, customers will have real choices for the first time – choices that will add value to their banking experience and even their lives.

 

Continue Reading

Magazine

Partner Events

Trending

Business15 hours ago

TOP 5 LINKEDIN PROFILE OPTIMIZATION HACKS FOR ASPIRING BANKERS

According to Firmex, finance professionals cannot afford to be not on LinkedIn. A significant number of organizations acquire talent in...

Wealth Management17 hours ago

TAPPING INTO THE DATA GOLDMINE: THE FUTURE OF DATA-DRIVEN CREDIT MANAGEMENT

Willand Brienen, product owner at Onguard   Data, and the insights it reveals, can offer organisations a vast number of...

Finance17 hours ago

ENLISTING TECHNOLOGY TO HELP FIGHT FINANCIAL CRIME

By Rachel Woolley, Director of Financial Crime Fenergo   Million-dollar properties, private jets and parties on luxury yachts with celebrity...

Banking17 hours ago

TRANSFORMATION IS NON-NEGOTIABLE FOR BANKS LOOKING TO DELIVER VALUE IN A POST-PANDEMIC WORLD

Andrew Warren, Head of Banking & Financial Services, UK&I, Cognizant   In addition to responding to changing customer expectations, higher...

Business17 hours ago

HOW MILLENNIALS CAN GET AHEAD WITH THEIR MONEY

Granville Turner, Director at company formation specialists, Turner Little.    Millennials are often painted as globe-trotting creatures that spend more...

STRUCTURED DATA STRUCTURED DATA
Business17 hours ago

STOPPING THE CHARGEBACKLASH

By Gabe McGloin, Head of Intl. Merchant Sales @ Verifi   Brands have been encouraging consumers to move their shopping...

Business17 hours ago

CONSUMERS ARE READY FOR BIOMETRIC PAYMENT CARDS

Lina Andolf-Orup, Head of Marketing at Fingerprints   We’ve come a long way in the evolution of digital payments. Magnetic...

Finance1 day ago

WHY IT PAYS TO MAKE CYBER SECURITY PART OF THE M&A DUE DILIGENCE PROCESS

Anurag Kahol, CTO at Bitglass   Mergers and acquisitions (M&As) enable business leaders to adapt fast to new opportunities. Whether...

Interviews1 day ago

GOING FOR INVESTMENT IN CENTRAL EUROPE: START-UP LIFE OUTSIDE A TRADITIONAL TECH HUB

A Q&A with Bence Jendruszak, Co-founder and COO at SEON   At what stage did you realise you were going...

Banking2 days ago

CLOUD ALLOWS BANKS TO BASK IN CHANGE

by: Elliott Limb, Chief Customer Officer at Mambu   As a new era of banking takes off, the cloud is...

Finance3 days ago

COVID-19 WILL DRIVE FINTECH ADOPTION – BUT AT WHAT COST?

By Ian Bradbury, CTO – Financial Services at Fujitsu UK   Even before the impact of Covid-19, the financial services...

Business3 days ago

HOW TECHNOLOGY IS POSITIVELY IMPACTING COMPLIANCE AND HOW IT IS HELPING TO STREAMLINE PROCESSING TIME AND COST FOR FIRMS

By Joe Woodbury, Director – Investment Management Solutions at Lawson Conner (part of IQ-EQ)   Private Equity & Real Estate...

News3 days ago

TECHCOMBANK AND COMPASS PLUS CELEBRATE 15 YEAR MILESTONE IN BANKING PARTNERSHIP

Since issuing the first Visa card 15 years ago using solutions provided by trusted partner Compass Plus, Techcombank, one of...

CHALLENGER BANKS CHALLENGER BANKS
Banking3 days ago

HOW TO MANAGE OPERATIONAL RISK AND ACCELERATE BANKING INNOVATION IN TIMES OF RAPID CHANGE

Danny Healy, financial technology evangelist, MuleSoft   The unprecedented disruption of COVID-19 has changed how consumers interact with banks; there’s...

STRUCTURED DATA STRUCTURED DATA
Finance3 days ago

WE NEED FINTECHS NOW MORE THAN EVER

Lubaina Manji, Senior Programme Manager, Nesta Challenges   Whilst the sun is far from setting on the COVID-19 pandemic, predictions...

SMALLER BANKS SMALLER BANKS
News3 days ago

XALQ BANK SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETES IMPLEMENTATION OF TRANZAXIS

As part of a strategic project to modernise its infrastructure, Xalq Bank, one of the leading banks in Azerbaijan, has...

Business3 days ago

WHAT WILL A POTENTIAL CUT IN VAT MEAN FOR BUSINESS OWNERS?

The big question on everyone’s lips right now is will the Chancellor Rishi Sunak cut VAT to stimulate spending and...

Wealth Management7 days ago

COULD YOUR PET BE INVALIDATING YOUR CAR INSURANCE?

Not securing your pets ahead of a long drive could void your policy 10 things you need to be aware...

Finance1 week ago

WHY AN AMBIGUOUS ECONOMIC FUTURE IS POINTING FINANCE TOWARDS ALTERNATIVE SOURCES OF DATA

Omri Orgad, Managing Director, Luminati Networks   Every market, every investor, and every business owner in the current climate is...

banks banks
Finance1 week ago

ACCELERATING THE TRANSFORMATION OF THE FINANCE SECTOR

By Scott Wilson, Director of service at eFax   Technological advancements have always played a key role in pushing boundaries...

Trending